Welcome to solo.ckpool.org!

bitcoin.conf for solo mining

I've done this a long time ago. It never was a problem. Nowadays I don't get it to work. Would be great to get some help:
My bitcoin.conf looks like this:
server=1 rpcuser=bomtom rpcpassword=secret rpcallowip=192.168.0.0/24 rpcport=8332 
If I point my miner to a pool via
./cgminer -o stratum+tcp://some.pool:8332 -u bomtom -p secret --api-listen --cs 9 --stmcu 0 -T --diff 12 
...it works just fine.
If I point my miner to my own bitcoind however via
./cgminer -o stratum+tcp://192.168.0.2:8332 -u bomtom -p secret --api-listen --cs 9 --stmcu 0 -T --diff 12 
...it doesn't work and just throws:
 [2018-01-01 04:14:10] Probing for an alive pool [2018-01-01 04:14:20] Waiting for work to be available from pools 
Is there anything wrong with my bitcoin.conf? My chain is up to date and bitcoind generally works.
submitted by bomtom1 to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

bitcoin.conf for solo mining /r/BitcoinMining

bitcoin.conf for solo mining /BitcoinMining submitted by BitcoinAllBot to BitcoinAll [link] [comments]

A tour of the Gridcoin wallet

Hey guys, I thought I would put together an in-depth tour of the Gridcoin wallet software for all of our recent newcomers. Here I'll be outlining all the features and functions the windows GUI wallet has to offer, along with some basic RPC command usage. I'll be using the windows wallet as an example, but both linux and macOS should be rather similar. I'll be including as many pictures as I can as embedded hyperlinks.
Edit: Note that since I originally made this there has been a UI update, so your client will be different colors but all the button locations are in the same place.
This is my first post like this, so please forgive me if this appears a little scatter-brained.
This will not cover the mining setup process for pool or solo miners.
When you launch the wallet software for the first time you should be greeted with this screen.

OVERVIEW TAB

After that prompt, you should be left sitting on the main overview tab with several fields on it.
From top to bottom:

SEND TAB

Now onto the other tabs on the left side. Currently we're on the Overview tab, lets move down to the Send tab. This tab it pretty self-explanatory, you use it if you want to send coins, but I'll go over the fields here:
  • Pay To: Enter a valid gridcoin address to send coins too. Gridcoin addresses always start with an S or and R.
  • Label: Enter a label here and it will put that address in your "address book" under that label for later use. You can leave it blank if you don't want it in your address book.
  • Message: Enter a message here if you want it attached to your transaction.
  • Amount: How many coins you want to send.
  • Add Attachment: Leave this alone, it is broken.
  • Track Coins: This doesn't do anything.

RECEIVE TAB

Now down to the Receive tab. Here you should have a single address listed. If you double click on the label field, you can edit it's label.
  • New: Generate a new address.
If you click on an address, the rest of the options should be clickable.
  • Copy: Copy the selected address to your clipboard.
  • Show QR Code: Show a scan-able QR code for the selected address.
  • Sign Message: Cryptographically sign a message using the selected address.

TRANSACTIONS TAB

The Transactions tab is pretty boring considering we have no transactions yet. But as you can see there are some sorting tools at the top for when you do have transactions listed.

ADDRESS BOOK TAB

The Address Book is where all the addresses you've labeled (that aren't yours) will show up.
  • Verify Message: Verifies a message was signed by the selected address.
The rest of the functions are similar to the functions on the Receive tab.

VOTING TAB

Onto the Voting tab. There wont be any polls because we aren't in sync yet.
  • Reload Polls: Pretty self-explanatory, I've never had to use this.
  • Load History: By default, the wallet will only display active polls. If you want to view past polls you can use this.
  • Create Poll: You can create a network-wide poll. You must have 100,000 coins as a requirement to make a poll. (Creating a poll does not consume the coins)
Here's what the Voting tab will look like once you're in sync

CONTEXT BAR

Now onto the context bar menus on the top.
Under File you have:
  • Backup Wallet/Config: This lets you backup your wallet configuration file just in case.
  • Export: You can export your Transactions tab or Address Book in CSV format.
  • Sign message: Does the same thing as on the Receive tab.
  • Verify message: Does the same thing as on the Address Book tab.
  • Exit: Close the wallet.
Under Settings you have:
  • Encrypt Wallet: Encrypts your wallet with a password. (we'll come back to this)
  • Change Passphrase: Allows you to change your encryption password.
  • Options: Opens the options menu. (We'll come back to this)
Under Community you have:
Under Advanced you have:
  • Advanced Configuration: Opens the Advanced Configuration menu. (Not so advanced if you ask me)
  • Neural Network: Allows you to view solo miners project statistics. It will be largely blank if you're not in sync yet.
  • FAQ: Don't touch this, It is broken.
  • Foundation: Don't touch this, It is broken.
  • Rebuild Block Chain: Starts the client syncing from 0. Don't worry, using this will not make you lose coins.
  • Download Blocks: Downloads the latest official snapshot, can help speed up syncing. The download progress tends to sit at 99.99% for a long time, don't worry, it's working.
Under Help you have:
  • Debug window: Opens the debug window. (We'll come back to this)
  • Diagnostics: Don't touch this, it is broken. This has since been fixed. You can use this to see if there is anything wrong with your setup.
  • About Gridcoin: Opens the About Dialog. This gives you your client version and other information.

OPTIONS

Now back to the options menu under Settings > Options.
Here we have the options menu main tab:
  • Pay transaction fee: The transaction fee that will be automatically paid when you make a transaction.
  • Reserve: You can reserve an amount so that it will always be available for spending.
  • Start Gridcoin on system login: Pretty self-explanatory
  • Detach databases at shutdown: Speeds up shutdown, but causes your blockchain file to no longer be portable.
On the Network tab:
  • Map port using UPnP: Attempts to connect to nodes through UPnP.
  • Connect through SOCKS proxy: Allows you to connect through a proxy.
The window tab is pretty self-explanatory.
The Display tab is also pretty self-explanatory, with the exception of:
  • Display coin control features (experts only!): This allows you to have a great deal of control over the coins in your wallet, check this for now and I'll explain how to use it further down. Don't forget to click "Apply".

ENCRYPTING YOUR WALLET

Now that all of that is out of the way. The first thing you'll want to do is encrypt your wallet. This prevents anybody with access to your computer from sending coins. This is something I would recommend everyone do.
Go to Settings > Encrypt Wallet and create a password. YOU CANNOT RECOVER YOUR COINS IF YOU FORGET YOUR PASSWORD.
Your wallet will close and you will have to start it up again. This time when it opens up, you should have a new button in the bottom left. Now if you want to stake you will have to unlock your wallet. Notice the "For staking only" box that is checked by default. If you want to send a beacon for solo mining or vote, you will need to uncheck this box.

GETTING IN SYNC AND ICONS

Before we continue, Let's wait until we're in sync. Depending on your internet speeds, this could take from several hours to over a day or 2. This can be sped up by using Advanced > Download Blocks, but this can still take several hours.
This is what an in-sync client should look like. Notice the green check to the right of the Receive tab. All of these icons give you information when you hover your mouse over them.
The lock
The arrow tells you if you're staking. If you aren't staking, it will tell you why you're not staking. If you are staking it will give you an estimated staking time. Staking is a very random process and this is only an estimate, not a countdown.
The connection bars tell you how many connections to the network you have.
The check tells you if you're in sync.

WHAT IS STAKING?

Now I've said "stake" about a million times so far and haven't explained it. Gridcoin is a Proof of Stake (PoS) coin.
Unlike bitcoins Proof of Work (PoW), PoS uses little system resources, so you can use those resources for scientific work. PoS works by users "Staking" with their balance. The higher the balance, the higher the chance to create, or "stake" a block. This means you need to have a positive balance in order to stake. Theoretically, you can stake with any amount over 0.0125 coins, but in practice it's recommended to have at least 2000 coins to reliably stake.
Staking is important for solo miners, because they get paid when they stake. Pool miners don't need to stake in order to get paid however. So if you want to solo mine, you'll need to buy some coins from an exchange or start in the pool first and move to solo when you have enough coins.
In addition to Research Rewards for miners, anyone who holds coins (solo miners, pool miners, and investors) gets 1.5% interest annually on top of your coins. So it can be beneficial for pool miners to stake as well.
Here is a snippet of what a research rewards transaction looks like from my personal wallet. I have a label on that address of "Payout address" as you can see here.

UTXOS AND COIN CONTROL

At this point you'll need some coins. You can use one of our faucets like this one or this one to test coin control out.
First let me explain what a UTXO is. UTXO stands for Unspent Transaction Output. Say you have an address with 0 coins in it, and someone sends you 10 coins like I've done here. Those 10 coins are added to that address in the form of a UTXO, so we have an address with one 10 coin UTXO in it.
Now we receive another 5 coins at the same address, like so. Now we have an address with one 10 coin UTXO and one 5 coin UTXO. But how do we view how our addresses are split up into different UTXOs?
Earlier we checked the "Display coin control features" box in Settings > Options > Display. Once that's checked you'll notice there's another section in the Send tab labeled "Coin Control Features". If you click the "Inputs" button, you'll get a new window. And look, there's our 2 UTXOs.
All UTXOs try to stake separately from each other, and remember that the chance a UTXO has to stake is proportional to it's size. So in this situation, my 10 coin UTXO has twice the chance to stake as my 5 coin UTXO. Now wallets, especially ones that make a lot of transactions, can get very fragmented over time. I've fragmented my wallet a little so I can show you what I'm talking about.
How do we clean this up? We can consolidate all this into one UTXO by checking all the boxes on the left and selecting OK.
Now pay attention to the fields on the top:
  • Quantity: The total amount of UTXOs we have selected.
  • Amount: The total amount of coins we have selected.
  • Fee: How much it would cost in fees to send all those UTXOs (more UTXOs = more transaction data = more fees)
  • After Fee: Amount - Fees.
  • Bytes: How large the transaction is in bytes.
  • Priority: How your client would prioritize making a transaction with this specific set of UTXOs selected had you not used coin control.
  • Low Output: If your transaction is less than 0.01 coins (I think).
  • Change: What you will get back in change.
  • custom change address: You can set the address you get your change back at, by default it will generate a new address.
So let's fill out our transaction so we end up with 1 UTXO at the end.
In "Pay To:" Just put any address in your wallet, and for the amount put what it has listed in the "After Fee" Field. Just like this.
Notice how we get no change back.
Now click "Send", we'll be prompted to enter our passphrase and we're asked if we want to pay the fee, go ahead and click "Yes".
Now if we go back to the Overview tab we get this funky icon. If you hover your mouse over it, it says "Payment to yourself", and the -0.0002 GRC is the network transaction fee.
(Ignore the first one, that was me fragmenting my wallet)
Now if we look at the Coin Control menu, we can see that we've slimmed our wallet down from 7 UTXOs to 1.
Now why would you want to use coin control?
2 Situations:
  1. UTXOs less than 0.0125 coins cannot stake. So you can combine a lot of tiny, useless UTXOs into 1 bigger one that can stake.
  2. After a UTXO stakes, it cannot stake for another 16 hours. So if you have 1 large UTXO that is big enough to stake more than once every 16 hours, you can split it into smaller UTXOs which can allow you to stake slightly more often.
  3. By default, the wallet will always generate a new address for change, which can make your wallet get very messy if you're sending lots of transactions. Keep in mind that more UTXOs = larger transactions = more fees.
Sidenote - When you stake, you will earn all research rewards owed reguardless of which UTXO staked. However, you'll earn the 1.5% interest for that UTXO. Not your whole wallet.

FORKING

A fork is when the network splits into multiple chains, with part of the network on each chain. A fork can happen when 2 blocks are staked by different clients at the same time or very close to the same time, or when your client rejects a block that should have been accepted due to a bug in the code or through some other unique circumstance.
How do I know if I'm on a fork?
Generally you can spot a fork by looking at the difficulty on your Overview tab. With current network conditions, if your difficulty is below 0.1, then you're probably on a fork.
You can confirm this by comparing your blockhash with someone elses, like a block explorer.
Go to [Help > Debug Window > Console]. This is the RPC console, we can use to do a lot of things. You can type help to get a list of commands, and you can type help [command you need help with] (without the brackets) to get information on a command. We'll be using the getblockhash [block number] command.
Type getblockhash [block number] in the console, but replace [block number] with the number listed next to the "Blocks:" field on the Overview tab.
This will spit out a crazy string of characters, this is the "blockhash" of that block.
Now head over to your favorite block explorer, I'll be using gridcoinstats. Find the block that you have the hash for, use the search bar or just find it in the list of blocks.
Now compare your hash with the one gridcoinstats gives you. Does it match?
If it matches, then you're probably good to go. If it matches but you still think you're on a fork, then you can try other block explorers, such as gridcoin.network or neuralminer.io.
If it doesn't match, then you need to try to get off that fork.
How do I get off a fork?
  1. Just wait for an hour or two. 95% of the time your client is able to recover itself from a fork given a little time.
  2. Restart the client, wait a few minutes to see if it fixes itself. If it doesn't restart again and wait. Repeat about 4 or 5 times.
  3. Find where the fork started. Using the getblockhash command, go back some blocks and compare hashes with that on a block explorer so you can narrow down what the last block you and the block explorer had in common. Then use reorganize [the last block hash you had in common]. Note that reorganize takes a blockhash, not a block number.
  4. Use Advanced > Download Blocks.
  5. If none of this works, you can take a look at social media (reddit/steemit) and see what other people are saying.

CONFIGURATION FILE

Your configuration file depends on your operation system:
  • On Windows: %appdata%\GridcoinResearch\
  • On Linux: ~/.GridcoinResearch/
  • On MacOS: /Users/USERNAME/Library/Application/Support/GridcoinResearch/
And it should look like this.
If you open up your gridcoinresearch.conf, you'll see the default one it generated. Note that if you entered your email earlier, the first line will have your email on it instead of "investor". If you decided you want to solo mine but didn't enter your email when you first started the wallet, go ahead and put your email on the first line in place of "investor". If you're a pool miner, just leave it as "investor".
Next, it's recommended that you use the addnodes on the gridcoin wiki. So our gridcoinresearch.conf will look like this.
A useful line for solo miners is PrimaryCPID=[YOUR CPID]. Sometimes your wallet can pick up on the wrong CPID so it's good to have that in there if you're solo mining.

RUNNING A LISTENING NODE

A listening node is a node that listens for blocks and transactions broadcasted from nodes and forwards them on to other nodes. For example, during the syncing process when you're getting your node running for the first time, you're downloading all the blocks from listening nodes. So running a listening node helps support the network.
Running a gridcoin listening node is simple. All you need to do is add listen=1 to your gridcoinresearch.conf and you need to forward port 32749 on your router.
If you don't know how to port forward, I'd suggest googling "How to port forward [your router manufacturer]".

QUICK LINKS

Gridcoin.us Official Website
Gridcoin.science Unofficial Website
Gridcoinstats.eu Block Explorer
NeuralMiner.io Block Explorer
Gridcoinstats.eu Faucet
Gridcoin.ch Faucet
Gridcoin Wiki
Gridcoin Github
GRCPool
Arikado Pool
And that's all I have for now!
I plan to keep this post up-to-date with changes in the client. So if anyone has any suggestions, have clarifications they want made, or maybe I got something wrong, then please feel free to leave a comment below or PM me!
submitted by Personthingman2 to gridcoin [link] [comments]

such beginner shibe thread wow how to get coin

 how to shibecoin v rich in minutes much instruct so simple any doge can do 

START HERE

UPDATE 1/21/14: I'm not updating this guide anymore. Most of the steps should still work though. See the wiki or check the sidebar for updated instructions.
Before you do anything else, you need to get a wallet. Until there's a secure online wallet, this means you need to download the dogecoin client.
Now open the client you just downloaded. You'll be given a default address automatically, and it should connect to peers and start downloading the dogechain (aka blockchain in formal speak). You'll know because there will be a progress bar at the bottom and at the lower right there should be a signal strength icon (TODO: add screenshots).
If you've waited 2 or 3 minutes and nothing is happening, copy this:
maxconnections=100 addnode=95.85.29.144 addnode=162.243.113.110 addnode=146.185.181.114 addnode=188.165.19.28 addnode=166.78.155.36 addnode=doge.scryptpools.com addnode=doge.netcodepool.org addnode=doge.pool.webxass.de addnode=doge.cryptopool.it addnode=pool.testserverino.de addnode=doge.luckyminers.com addnode=doge.cryptovalley.com addnode=miner.coinedup.comdoge addnode=doge.cryptoculture.net addnode=dogepool.pw addnode=doge.gentoomen.org addnode=doge.cryptominer.net addnode=67.205.20.10 addnode=162.243.113.110 addnode=78.46.57.132 
And paste it into a new text file called dogecoin.conf, which you then place into the dogecoin app directory.
Now restart your qt client and the blockchain should start downloading in about 1-2 minutes.
Once it finished downloading, you're ready to send and receive Dogecoins!

GETTING COINS

Decide how you want to get Dogecoin. Your options are:
I'll go into detail about each of these. I'm currently writing this out. I'll make edits as I add sections. Suggestions are welcome.

MINING

Mining is how new dogecoins are created. If you're new to crypto currencies, read this. To mine (also called "digging"), a computer with a decent GPU (graphics card) is recommended. You can also mine with your CPU, but it's not as efficient.

GPU MINING

These instructions cover only Windows for now. To mine, you'll need to figure out what GPU you have. It'll be either AMD/ATI or Nvidia. The setup for both is approximately the same.

Step One: Choose a pool

There's a list of pools on the wiki. For now it doesn't really matter which one you choose. You can easily switch later.
NOTE: You can mine in two ways. Solo mining is where you mine by yourself. When you find a block you get all the reward. Pool mining is when you team up with other miners to work on the same block together. This makes it more likely that you'll find a block, but you won't get all of it, you'll have to split it up with others according to your share of the work. Pool mining is recommended because it gives you frequent payouts, because you find more blocks. The larger the pool you join, the more frequent the payouts, but the smaller the reward you get.
Over a long period of time the difference between pool and solo mining goes away, but if you solo mine it might be months before you get any coins.

Step two: Set up pool account

The pool you chose should have a getting started page. Read it and follow the instructions. Instructions vary but the general idea is:
When you're done with this, you'll need to know:

Step three: Download mining software

For best performance you'll need the right mining software.
Unzip the download anywhere you want.

Step four: Set up miner

Create a text file in the same folder as your miner application. Inside, put the command you'll be running (remove brackets).
For AMD it's cgminer.exe --scrypt -o stratum+tcp://: -u -p
For Nvidia it's cudaminer.exe -o stratum+tcp://: -O :
Substitute the right stuff in for the placeholders. Then on the next line of the text file type pause. This will let you see any errors that you get. Then save the file with any name you want, as long as the file extension is .bat. For example mine_serverName.bat.

Step five: Launch your miner

Just open the .bat file and a command line window should pop up, letting you know that the miner is starting. Once it starts, it should print out your hash rate.
If you now go to the pool website, the dashboard should start showing your hashrate. At first it'll be lower than what it says in the miner, but that's because the dashboard is taking a 5 minute average. It'll catch up soon enough.
NOTE: A normal hashrate is between 50 Kh/s up to even 1 Mh/s depending on your GPU.

You're now mining Dogecoins

That's it, nothing more to it.

CPU MINING

CPU mining isn't really recommended, because you'll be spending a lot on more on power than you'd make from mining Dogecoin. You could better spend that money on buying Dogecoin by trading. But if you have free electricity and want to try it out, check out this informative forum post.

Trading

Trading has been difficult so far, but Dogecoin just got added to a few new exchanges. If you don't have a giant mining rig, this is probably the best way to get 100k or more dogecoins at the moment. I'll write up a more complete guide, but for now check out these sites:

Faucets

Faucets are sites that give out free coins. Usually a site will give out somewhere between 1 and 100 Dogecoin. Every site has its own time limits, but usually you can only receive coins once every few hours, or in some cases, days. It's a great way to get started. All you do is copy your address from the receive section of your wallet and enter it on some faucet sites. Check out /dogecoinfaucets for more. If you go to each site on there you might end up with a couple hundred Dogecoin!

Begging

This method is pretty straightforward. Post your receiving address, and ask for some coins. Such poor shibe. The only catch is, don't do it here! Please go to /dogecoinbeg.

Tips

At the moment there are two tip bots:
Other redditors can give you Dogecoin by summoning the tip bot, something like this:
+dogetipbot 5 doge
This might happen if you make a good post, or someone just wants to give out some coins. Once you receive a tip you have to accept it in a few days or else it'll get returned. Do this by following the instructions on the message you receive in your inbox. You reply to the bot with "+accept". Commands go in the message body. Once you do that, the bot will create a tipping address for you, and you can use the links in the message you receive to see your info, withdraw coins to your dogecoin-qt wallet, see your history, and a bunch of other stuff.
As a bonus, so_doge_tip has a feature where you can get some Dogecoins to start with in exchange for how much karma you have. To do this, send the message "+redeem DOGE" to so_doge_tip. You'll need to create a tipping account if you don't have one.
If you want to create a tipping account without ever being tipped first, message either of the bots with "+register" and an address will be created for you.

CHANGELOG

  • 1/21/14 - Added note about this thread no longer being updated
  • 1/21/14 - Changed wallet links to official site
  • 12/27/13 - Added 1.3 wallet-qt links
  • 12/21/13 - Added new windows 1.2 wallet link
  • 12/20/13 - Fixed +redeem text
  • 12/18/13 - Added short blurb on trading.
  • 12/18/13 - Updated cudaminer to new version (cudaminer-2013-12-18.zip).
  • 12/18/13 - Fixed +redeem link
  • 12/18/13 - Updates dogecoin.conf, from here.
  • 12/17/13 - Linked to mining explanation.
  • 12/17/13 - Added link to CPU mining tutorial, in response to this.
  • 12/16/13 - Added links to tip commands, link to dogetipbot wiki.
  • 12/16/13 - Note about tip commands going in body, in response to this.
  • 12/16/13 - Added link to cgminer mirror, thanks to scubasteve812 and thanks to Bagrisham.
  • 12/16/13 - Note about removing brackets in response to this.
  • 12/15/13 - Fixed hash rate as per this comment, thanks lleti
  • 12/15/13 - Added info for all other ways of getting money, except for trading (placeholder for now)
  • 12/15/13 - Added windows GPU mining instructions 12/15/13 - Added wallet instructions, list of how to get money
submitted by lego-banana to dogecoin [link] [comments]

The Nexus FAQ - part 1

Full formatted version: https://docs.google.com/document/d/16KKjVjQH0ypLe00aoTJ_hZyce7RAtjC5XHom104yn6M/
 

Nexus 101:

  1. What is Nexus?
  2. What benefits does Nexus bring to the blockchain space?
  3. How does Nexus secure the network and reach consensus?
  4. What is quantum resistance and how does Nexus implement this?
  5. What is Nexus’ Unified Time protocol?
  6. Why does Nexus need its own satellite network?
 

The Nexus Currency:

  1. How can I get Nexus?
  2. How much does a transaction cost?
  3. How fast does Nexus transfer?
  4. Did Nexus hold an ICO? How is Nexus funded?
  5. Is there a cap on the number of Nexus in existence?
  6. What is the difference between the Oracle wallet and the LLD wallet?
  7. How do I change from Oracle to the LLD wallet?
  8. How do I install the Nexus Wallet?
 

Types of Mining or Minting:

  1. Can I mine Nexus?
  2. How do I mine Nexus?
  3. How do I stake Nexus?
  4. I am staking with my Nexus balance. What are trust weight, block weight and stake weight?
 

Nexus 101:

1. What is Nexus (NXS)?
Nexus is a digital currency, distributed framework, and peer-to-peer network. Nexus further improves upon the blockchain protocol by focusing on the following core technological principles:
Nexus will combine our in-development quantum-resistant 3D blockchain software with cutting edge communication satellites to deliver a free, distributed, financial and data solution. Through our planned satellite and ground-based mesh networks, Nexus will provide uncensored internet access whilst bringing the benefits of distributed database systems to the world.
For a short video introduction to Nexus Earth, please visit this link
 
2. What benefits does Nexus bring to the blockchain space?
As Nexus has been developed, an incredible amount of time has been put into identifying and solving several key limitations:
Nexus is also developing a framework called the Lower Level Library. This LLL will incorporate the following improvements:
For information about more additions to the Lower Level Library, please visit here
 
3. How does Nexus secure the network and reach consensus?
Nexus is unique amongst blockchain technology in that Nexus uses 3 channels to secure the network against attack. Whereas Bitcoin uses only Proof-of-Work to secure the network, Nexus combines a prime number channel, a hashing channel and a Proof-of-Stake channel. Where Bitcoin has a difficulty adjustment interval measured in weeks, Nexus can respond to increased hashrate in the space of 1 block and each channel scales independently of the other two channels. This stabilizes the block times at ~50 seconds and ensures no single channel can monopolize block production. This means that a 51% attack is much more difficult to launch because an attacker would need to control all 3 channels.
Every 60 minutes, the Nexus protocol automatically creates a checkpoint. This prevents blocks from being created or modified dated prior to this checkpoint, thus protecting the chain from malicious attempts to introduce an alternate blockchain.
 
4. What is quantum resistance and how does Nexus implement it?
To understand what quantum resistance is and why it is important, you need to understand how quantum computing works and why it’s a threat to blockchain technology. Classical computing uses an array of transistors. These transistors form the heart of your computer (the CPU). Each transistor is capable of being either on or off, and these states are used to represent the numerical values 1 and 0.
Binary digits’ (bits) number of states depends on the number of transistors available, according to the formula 2n, where n is the number of transistors. Classical computers can only be in one of these states at any one time, so the speed of your computer is limited to how fast it can change states.
Quantum computers utilize quantum bits, “qubits,” which are represented by the quantum state of electrons or photons. These particles are placed into a state called superposition, which allows the qubit to assume a value of 1 or 0 simultaneously.
Superposition permits a quantum computer to process a higher number of data possibilities than a classical computer. Qubits can also become entangled. Entanglement makes a qubit dependant on the state of another, enabling quantum computing to calculate complex problems, extremely quickly.
One such problem is the Discrete Logarithm Problem which elliptic curve cryptography relies on for security. Quantum computers can use Shor’s algorithm to reverse a key in polynomial time (which is really really really fast). This means that public keys become vulnerable to quantum attack, since quantum computers are capable of being billions of times faster at certain calculations. One way to increase quantum resistance is to require more qubits (and more time) by using larger private keys:
Bitcoin Private Key (256 bit) 5Kb8kLf9zgWQnogidDA76MzPL6TsZZY36hWXMssSzNydYXYB9KF
Nexus Private Key (571 bit) 6Wuiv513R18o5cRpwNSCfT7xs9tniHHN5Lb3AMs58vkVxsQdL4atHTF Vt5TNT9himnCMmnbjbCPxgxhSTDE5iAzCZ3LhJFm7L9rCFroYoqz
Bitcoin addresses are created by hashing the public key, so it is not possible to decrypt the public key from the address; however, once you send funds from that address, the public key is published on the blockchain rendering that address vulnerable to attack. This means that your money has higher chances of being stolen.
Nexus eliminates these vulnerabilities through an innovation called signature chains. Signature chains will enable access to an account using a username, password and PIN. When you create a transaction on the network, you claim ownership of your signature chain by revealing the public key of the NextHash (the hash of your public key) and producing a signature from the one time use private key. Your wallet then creates a new private/public keypair, generates a new NextHash, including the corresponding contract. This contract can be a receive address, a debit, a vote, or any other type of rule that is written in the contract code.
This keeps the public key obscured until the next transaction, and by divorcing the address from the public key, it is unnecessary to change addresses in order to change public keys. Changing your password or PIN code becomes a case of proving ownership of your signature chain and broadcasting a new transaction with a new NextHash for your new password and/or PIN. This provides the ability to login to your account via the signature chain, which becomes your personal chain within the 3D chain, enabling the network to prove and disprove trust, and improving ease of use without sacrificing security.
The next challenge with quantum computers is that Grover’s algorithm reduces the security of one-way hash function by a factor of two. Because of this, Nexus incorporates two new hash functions, Skein and Keccak, which were designed in 2008 as part of a contest to create a new SHA3 standard. Keccak narrowly defeated Skein to win the contest, so to maximize their potential Nexus combines these algorithms. Skein and Keccak utilize permutation to rotate and mix the information in the hash.
To maintain a respective 256/512 bit quantum resistance, Nexus uses up to 1024 bits in its proof-of-work, and 512 bits for transactions.
 
5. What is the Unified Time protocol?
All blockchains use time-stamping mechanisms, so it is important that all nodes operate using the same clock. Bitcoin allows for up to 2 hours’ discrepancy between nodes, which provides a window of opportunity for the blockchain to be manipulated by time-related attack vectors. Nexus eliminates this vulnerability by implementing a time synchronization protocol termed Unified Time. Unified Time also enhances transaction processing and will form an integral part of the 3D chain scaling solution.
The Unified Time protocol facilitates a peer-to-peer timing system that keeps all clocks on the network synchronized to within a second. This is seeded by selected nodes with timestamps derived from the UNIX standard; that is, the number of seconds since January 1st, 1970 00:00 UTC. Every minute, the seed nodes report their current time, and a moving average is used to calculate the base time. Any node which sends back a timestamp outside a given tolerance is rejected.
It is important to note that the Nexus network is fully synchronized even if an individual wallet displays something different from the local time.
 
6. Why does Nexus need its own satellite network?
One of the key limitations of a purely electronic monetary system is that it requires a connection to the rest of the network to verify transactions. Existing network infrastructure only services a fraction of the world’s population.
Nexus, in conjunction with Vector Space Systems, is designing communication satellites, or cubesats, to be launched into Low Earth Orbit in 2019. Primarily, the cubesat mesh network will exist to give Nexus worldwide coverage, but Nexus will also utilize its orbital and ground mesh networks to provide free and uncensored internet access to the world.
 

The Nexus Currency (NXS):

1. How can I get Nexus?
There are two ways you can obtain Nexus. You can either buy Nexus from an exchange, or you can run a miner and be rewarded for finding a block. If you wish to mine Nexus, please follow our guide found below.
Currently, Nexus is available on the following exchanges:
Nexus is actively reaching out to other exchanges to continue to be listed on cutting edge new financial technologies..
 
2. How much does a transaction cost?
Under Nexus, the fee structure for making a transaction depends on the size of your transaction. A default fee of 0.01 NXS will cover most transactions, and users have the option to pay higher fees to ensure their transactions are processed quickly.
When the 3D chain is complete and the initial 10-year distribution period finishes, Nexus will absorb these fees through inflation, enabling free transactions.
 
3. How fast does Nexus transfer?
Nexus reaches consensus approximately every ~ 50 seconds. This is an average time, and will in some circumstances be faster or slower. NXS currency which you receive is available for use after just 6 confirmations. A confirmation is proof from a node that the transaction has been included in a block. The number of confirmations in this transaction is the number that states how many blocks it has been since the transaction is included. The more confirmations a transaction has, the more secure its placement in the blockchain is.
 
4. Did Nexus hold an ICO? How is Nexus funded?
The Nexus Embassy, a 501(C)(3) not-for-profit corporation, develops and maintains the Nexus blockchain software. When Nexus began under the name Coinshield, the early blocks were mined using the Developer and Exchange (Ambassador) addresses, which provides funding for the Nexus Embassy.
The Developer Fund fuels ongoing development and is sourced by a 1.5% commission per block mined, which will slowly increase to 2.5% after 10 years. This brings all the benefits of development funding without the associated risks.
The Ambassador (renamed from Exchange) keys are funded by a 20% commission per block reward. These keys are mainly used to pay for marketing, and producing and launching the Nexus satellites.
When Nexus introduces developer and ambassador contracts, they will be approved, denied, or removed by six voting groups namely: currency, developer, ambassador, prime, hash, and trust.
Please Note: The Nexus Embassy reserves the sole right to trade, sell and or use these funds as required; however, Nexus will endeavor to minimize the impact that the use of these funds has upon the NXS market value.
 
5. Is there a cap on the number of NXS in existence?
After an initial 10-year distribution period ending on September 23rd, 2024, there will be a total of 78 million NXS. Over this period, the reward gradient for mining Nexus follows a decaying logarithmic curve instead of the reward halving inherent in Bitcoin. This avoids creating a situation where older mining equipment is suddenly unprofitable, encouraging miners to continue upgrading their equipment over time and at the same time reducing major market shocks on block halving events.
When the distribution period ends, the currency supply will inflate annually by a maximum of 3% via staking and by 1% via the prime and hashing channels. This inflation is completely unlike traditional inflation, which degrades the value of existing coins. Instead, the cost of providing security to the blockchain is paid by inflation, eliminating transaction fees.
Colin Cantrell - Nexus Inflation Explained
 
6. What is the difference between the LLD wallet and the Oracle wallet?
Due to the scales of efficiency needed by blockchain, Nexus has developed a custom-built database called the Lower Level Database. Since the development of the LLD wallet 0.2.3.1, which is a precursor to the Tritium updates, you should begin using the LLD wallet to take advantage of the faster load times and improved efficiency.
The Oracle wallet is a legacy wallet which is no longer maintained or updated. It utilized the Berkeley DB, which is not designed to meet the needs of a blockchain. Eventually, users will need to migrate to the LLD wallet. Fortunately, the wallet.dat is interchangeable between wallets, so there is no risk of losing access to your NXS.
 
7. How do I change from Oracle to the LLD wallet?
Step 1 - Backup your wallet.dat file. You can do this from within the Oracle wallet Menu, Backup Wallet.
Step 2 - Uninstall the Oracle wallet. Close the wallet and navigate to the wallet data directory. On Windows, this is the Nexus folder located at %APPDATA%\Nexus. On macOS, this is the Nexus folder located at ~/Library/Application Support/Nexus. Move all of the contents to a temporary folder as a backup.
Step 3 - Copy your backup of wallet.dat into the Nexus folder located as per Step 2.
Step 4 - Install the Nexus LLD wallet. Please follow the steps as outlined in the next section. Once your wallet is fully synced, your new wallet will have access to all your addresses.
 
8. How do I install the Nexus Wallet?
You can install your Nexus wallet by following these steps:
Step 1 - Download your wallet from www.nexusearth.com. Click the Downloads menu at the top and select the appropriate wallet for your operating system.
Step 2 - Unzip the wallet program to a folder. Before running the wallet program, please consider space limitations and load times. On the Windows OS, the wallet saves all data to the %APPDATA%\Nexus folder, including the blockchain, which is currently ~3GB.
On macOS, data is saved to the ~/Library/Application Support/Nexus folder. You can create a symbolic link, which will allow you to install this information in another location.
Using Windows, follow these steps:
On macOS, follow these steps:
Step 3 (optional) - Before running the wallet, we recommend downloading the blockchain database manually. Nexus Earth maintains a copy of the blockchain data which can save hours from the wallet synchronization process. Please go to www.nexusearth.com and click the Downloads menu.
Step 4 (optional) - Extract the database file. This is commonly found in the .zip or .rar format, so you may need a program like 7zip to extract the contents. Please extract it to the relevant directory, as outlined in step 2.
Step 5 - You can now start your wallet. After it loads, it should be able to complete synchronization in a short time. This may still take a couple of hours. Once it has completed synchronizing, a green check mark icon will appear in the lower right corner of the wallet.
Step 6 - Encrypt your wallet. This can be done within the wallet, under the Settings menu. Encrypting your wallet will lock it, requiring a password in order to send transactions.
Step 7 - Backup your wallet.dat file. This can be done from the File menu inside the wallet. This file contains the keys to the addresses in your wallet. You may wish to keep a secure copy of your password somewhere, too, in case you forget it or someone else (your spouse, for example) ever needs it.
You should back up your wallet.dat file again any time you create – or a Genesis transaction creates (see “staking” below) – a new address.
 

Types of Mining or Minting:

1.Can I mine Nexus?
Yes, there are 2 channels that you can use to mine Nexus, and 1 channel of minting:
Prime Mining Channel
This mining channel looks for a special prime cluster of a set length. This type of calculation is resistant to ASIC mining, allowing for greater decentralization. This is most often performed using the CPU.
Hashing Channel
This channel utilizes the more traditional method of hashing. This process adds a random nonce, hashes the data, and compares the resultant hash against a predetermined format set by the difficulty. This is most often performed using a GPU.
Proof of Stake (nPoS)
Staking is a form of mining NXS. With this process, you can receive NXS rewards from the network for continuously operating your node (wallet). It is recommended that you only stake with a minimum balance of 1000 NXS. It’s not impossible to stake with less, but it becomes harder to maintain trust. Losing trust resets the interest rate back to 0.5% per annum.
 
2. How do I mine Nexus?
As outlined above, there are two types of mining and 1 proof of stake. Each type of mining uses a different component of your computer to find blocks, the CPU or the GPU. Nexus supports CPU and GPU mining on Windows only. There are also third-party macOS builds available.
Please follow the instructions below for the relevant type of miner.
 
Prime Mining:
Almost every CPU is capable of mining blocks on this channel. The most effective method of mining is to join a mining pool and receive a share of the rewards based on the contribution you make. To create your own mining facility, you need the CPU mining software, and a NXS address. This address cannot be on an exchange. You create an address when you install your Nexus wallet. You can find the related steps under How Do I Install the Nexus Wallet?
Please download the relevant miner from http://nexusearth.com/mining.html. Please note that there are two different miner builds available: the prime solo miner and the prime pool miner. This guide will walk you through installing the pool miner only.
Step 1 - Extract the archive file to a folder.
Step 2 - Open the miner.conf file. You can use the default host and port, but these may be changed to a pool of your choice. You will need to change the value of nxs_address to the address found in your wallet. Sieve_threads is the number of CPU threads you want to use to find primes. Ptest_threads is the number of CPU threads you want to test the primes found by the sieve. As a general rule, the number of threads used for the sieve should be 75% of the threads used for testing.
It is also recommended to add the following line to the options found in the .conf file:
"experimental" : "true"
This option enables the miner to use an improved sieve algorithm which will enable your miner to find primes at a faster rate.
Step 3 - Run the nexus_cpuminer.exe file. For a description of the information shown in this application, please read this guide.
 
Hashing:
The GPU is a dedicated processing unit housed on-board your graphics card. The GPU is able to perform certain tasks extremely well, unlike your CPU, which is designed for parallel processing. Nexus supports both AMD and Nvidia GPU mining, and works best on the newer models. Officially, Nexus does not support GPU pool mining, but there are 3rd party miners with this capability.
The latest software for the Nvidia miner can be found here. The latest software for the AMD miner can be found here. The AMD miner is a third party miner. Information and advice about using the AMD miner can be found on our Slack channel. This guide will walk you through the Nvidia miner.
Step 1 - Close your wallet. Navigate to %appdata%\Nexus (~/Library/Application Support/Nexus on macOS) and open the nexus.conf file. Depending on your wallet, you may or may not have this file. If not, please create a new txt file and save it as nexus.conf
You will need to add the following lines before restarting your wallet:
Step 2 - Extract the files into a new folder.
Step 3 - Run the nexus.bat file. This will run the miner and deposit any rewards for mining a block into the account on your wallet.
For more information on either Prime Mining or Hashing, please join our Slack and visit the #mining channel. Additional information can be found here.
 
3. How do I stake Nexus?
Once you have your wallet installed, fully synchronized and encrypted, you can begin staking by:
After you begin staking, you will receive a Genesis transaction as your first staking reward. This establishes a Trust key in your wallet and stakes your wallet balance on that key. From that point, you will periodically receive additional Trust transactions as further staking rewards for as long as your Trust key remains active.
IMPORTANT - After you receive a Genesis transaction, backup your wallet.dat file immediately. You can select the Backup Wallet option from the File menu, or manually copy the file directly. If you do not do this, then your Nexus balance will be staked on the Trust key that you do not have backed up, and you risk loss if you were to suffer a hard drive failure or other similar problem. In the future, signature chains will make this precaution unnecessary.
 
4. I am staking with my Nexus balance. What are interest rate, trust weight, block weight, and stake weight?
These items affect the size and frequency of staking rewards after you receive your initial Genesis transaction. When staking is active, the wallet displays a clock icon in the bottom right corner. If you hover your mouse pointer over the icon, a tooltip-style display will open up, showing their current values.
Please remember to backup your wallet.dat file (see question 3 above) after you receive a Genesis transaction.
Interest Rate - The minting rate at which you will receive staking rewards, displayed as an annual percentage of your NXS balance. It starts at 0.5%, increasing to 3% after 12 months. The rate increase is not linear but slows over time. It takes several weeks to reach 1% and around 3 months to reach 2%.
With this rate, you can calculate the average amount of NXS you can expect to receive each day for staking.
Trust Weight - An indication of how much the network trusts your node. It starts at 5% and increases much more quickly than the minting (interest) rate, reaching 100% after one month. Your level of trust increases your stake weight (below), thus increasing your chances of receiving staking transactions. It becomes easier to maintain trust as this value increases.
Block Weight - Upon receipt of a Genesis transaction, this value will begin increasing slowly, reaching 100% after 24 hours. Every time you receive a staking transaction, the block weight resets. If your block weight reaches 100%, then your Trust key expires and everything resets (0.5% interest rate, 5% trust weight, waiting for a new Genesis transaction).
This 24-hour requirement will be replaced by a gradual decay in the Tritium release. As long as you receive a transaction before it decays completely, you will hold onto your key. This change addresses the potential of losing your trust key after months of staking simply because of one unlucky day receiving trust transactions.
Stake Weight - The higher your stake weight, the greater your chance of receiving a transaction. The exact value is a derived by a formula using your trust weight and block weight, which roughly equals the average of the two. Thus, each time you receive a transaction, your stake weight will reset to approximately half of your current level of trust.
submitted by scottsimon36 to nexusearth [link] [comments]

How to Mine BiblePay on Windows

This guide is outdated, please refer to:
https://wiki.biblepay.org/POBH_Setup
https://wiki.biblepay.org/PODC_Setup
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IMPORTANT - Evolution Upgrade:
Quick Start https://wiki.biblepay.org/Quick_Start
Evolution Upgrade Information https://wiki.biblepay.org/Evolution_Upgrade
Getting Started with Evolution https://wiki.biblepay.org/Getting_Started_with_Evolution
Generic Smart Contracts https://wiki.biblepay.org/Generic_Smart_Contracts
What is BiblePay Evolution? https://www.reddit.com/BiblePay/comments/bifvpk/biblepay_evolution_what_is_it/
Windows Guide: 1. Download 32 or 64 bit .exe from https://www.biblepay.org/wallet/ 2. Double Click / Run .exe file and step through Install process 3. Run BiblePay 4. Click Tools >> One Click Mining, (Or set up mining manually with steps a through d below)
     a. Open File Explorer, in address bar type: %appdata%      b. Press Enter      c. Go to BiblepayEvolution folder      d. Open biblepay.conf file for editing, add lines and Save
addnode=node.biblepay.org gen=1 genproclimit=1 
NOTE: addnode is used to give the wallet a starting node to connect to and sync with gen=1 turns on mining by default when the wallet is opened genproclimit=1 sets number of mining threads to 1 by default

5. Close BiblePay and Run it again 6. In BiblePay, go to Tools menu, Click Debug Console 7. Type these commands into the debug console:
getinfo getmininginfo help 
NOTE: getinfo will show you what block number your wallet is currently on and the version number getmininginfo will show you how many threads are running and how much mining hash you have help will show you all the other commands you can use

Threads: 8. To change number of threads to use up for mining
a. Edit %appdata%/BiblepayEvolution/biblepay.conf file: Find with File Explorer or inside the wallet go to Menu >> Tools >> Open Wallet Configuration File
genproclimit=X 
and restart BiblePay -or- b. Menu >> Tools >> Debug Console >> Type command:
setgenerate true X 
(Replace X with the number of threads you want to use Open Task Manager to view CPU usage)

Using the Pool:
NOTE: To use the pool you must now use the external miner, not the wallet miner https://whitewalr.us/2019/biblepay-nomp-pool-mining.html
  1. Set up an account on pool website: https://pool.biblepay.org/
  2. Create Worker Username(s) - Workers tab >>> Add (NOTE: Your Worker Username needs to be unique)
  3. Enable pool and add Worker Username in %appdata%/BiblepayEvolution/biblepay.conf file, add these lines:
    pool=https://pool.biblepay.org workerid=insertWorkerUsernameHere
4. Restart BiblePay
How to Withdraw Coins From Pool? The pool holds onto your coins, go to "Account" >> "Withdraw" to withdraw your coins In your BiblePay Wallet go to "File" >> "Receiving Address" and you can right click and copy the address and paste it into the Pool's Withdraw screen as the "Destination Address", then click the "Withdraw" button and the coins will be sent from the Pool to your Wallet
Setup Auto-Withdraw Navigate to Account >>> Account Settings >>> Verify your BBP Receiving Address >>> Click Authorize-Auto-Withdraws
Why use a Pool? As the network hash rises (as more miners are mining), it can take longer and longer to solve a block, by using the pool, everyone works together with all of their hash power to solve blocks, and the reward gets split between everyone who contributed based on how much they contributed in hash.
With solo mining (not using the pool) it may take 1 month to finally solve a block and get large BBP reward, with pool you can get small frequent BBP rewards every ~30 minutes. (BBP meaning BiblePay coins)

How to Update: Download exe from biblepay.org and install again, your wallet will stay intact

Backup:
Your wallet.dat stores your private keys that contain the access to your coins, this file is backed up every 24 hours in the backups folder, We also recommend that you save a copy of this file in other places, like a flash drive
Learn More about Backing Up your Wallet.dat https://www.reddit.com/BiblePay/comments/7lksp4/backup_walletdat/

FAQ
QUESTION: How long does it take for coins to mature? If you're solo mining, the coins become mature after ~100 blocks. If you're using the pool, they become mature after 24 hours
QUESTION: How do I know if I am currently mining? In your wallet >> In Top left Menu select "Tools" >> Click "Debug Console" Type in the command: getgenerate If it returns true, mining is turned on command: getmininginfo Will show how much "hashps" (hashing) your pc is doing, "genproclimit" will show how many mining threads you are using "poolmining" will be show value of true if you are successfully mining on the pool

How to Buy or Sell BBP coins?
You can buy and sell BBP coins for Bitcoin on the Exchanges we are listed on: SouthXChange: https://www.southxchange.com/Market/Book/BBP/BTC CoinExchange.io: https://www.coinexchange.io/market/BBP/BTC

Misc: Building headless Bitcoin and Bitcoin-qt on Windows https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=149479.0 https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/commandline/wsl/install_guide https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Windows_Subsystem_for_Linux https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=2388064.msg27133702#msg27133702 https://github.com/OleEichhorn/bitcoin-msvc

OUTDATED
Windows Mining Video Tutorial by copper101great https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K1yKx8KsH60
submitted by togoshige to BiblePay [link] [comments]

Solo mining for Gits and Shiggles

I run a full Bitcoin node. Lately I've been playing around with setting up solo mining with BFGMiner, just experimenting with CPUs and GPUs, in full knowledge its a purely academic thing with zero chance of succeeding, intending only to deepen my understanding of the system. Seems to work well, for the most part.
Except when I point my S9's at the pool, I only get about 250 GH instead of 13.5 TH each. I've made sure to turn off overt asciboost when I point them at my experiment, no effect, and they definitely are connected. Does anyone else play around with this stuff and might know the solution already?
FWIW: Ubuntu Bitcoin Core v0.17 BFGMiner v5.5.0
Bitcoin.conf, server, daemon, listen, and txindex set to 1. rpcuser and rpcpassword are set, rpcallowip and rpcport are all good(and proven as I can connect other pcs over the LAN just fine for cpu/gpu)
BFGMiner -o http://127.0.01:8332 -u user - pword --generate-to $address --coinbase-sig "LOL" --stratum-port:3333
Any suggestions?
submitted by NDragon951 to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

I want to solo mine.

Hello bitcoinmining, First let me say- I KNOW MY ODDS ARE TERRIBLE. I don't care. I KNOW I WONT EVER MINE A BLOCK. I don't care. I KNOW I AM LOSING MONEY. I don't care.
Heres the deal, I know I can run bitcoinqt and point the miners at it. But I have some block erutpers and I have a RPi on its way. What I want to do is set it up and check it once a week. I don't want to leave my laptop on and in my office 24/7. I don't care about the .00001btc they mine on slushs pool.
Correct me if I am wrong, but the easiest way to do this is to create my own pool. Which essentially requires me to leave me laptop at the office 24/7. no good.
Any Ideas?
submitted by 321Ben to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

ANN - RENESIS - LTME (Long Term Mining Evolution)

ANN - RENESIS - LTME (Long Term Mining Evolution)
https://preview.redd.it/wulcw7lgbhb11.png?width=500&format=png&auto=webp&s=c3aca3a98e0b699d88e99acee4a5dc236c8b39e0
LTME ( Long Term Mining Evolution) With ASIC Resistance Promise hav0k, The Renesis Core

Renesis Specifications:

Algorithm: Renesis Ticker: RESS Whitepaper v1: https://github.com/renesisgroup/whitepapeblob/masteRENESIS-paper.pdf Block Time: 2 minutes Block Reward: Variable. Refer to whitepaper for reward structure. Halving: Yes Doubling: Yes Mined Confirmations PoW/PoS : 60 TX Confirmations: 10 Minimum RX confirmations to forward: 1 Total Coin Supply: 350M for Proof of Work PoS Cap: No PoS Stake Reward: 10% per year Pre-mine: Yes ( First 100 Blocks mined on low difficulty with CPUMiner) Bounties Available: Yes - From Premine Rewards Available for Community Developers: Yes, from Premine CPUMiner Available: Yes - Windows binary & source. NVIDIA GPUMiner Available: Yes ( Reward for fair release of GPUMiner is paid! 50,000 RESS ) AMD GPUMiner Available: No ( Reward for fair release of GPUMiner is > 12,000 RESS ) Renesis New Logo Design Competition: Yes ( Reward of 2000 RESS ) Renesis QT Wallet Theming Competition: Yes ( Reward of 5000 RESS ) Renesis V2 Static Website Design Competition: Yes ( Reward of 7000 RESS ) Renesis public Pool addition reward: Yes (10000 RESS) - First 3 Pools. Renesis Node Hosting: Yes ( Reward of 1000 RESS offered for 1 month of hosting ) Translation Bounties: Yes ( Reward of 500 RESS per translation posted ) Social Media Bounties: Yes ( Connect with us on our channels for information ) ICO: No - Bitcoin Talk ANN for everyone to mine starting 101 block Masternodes: Planned MainNet P2P port: 9775 MainNet RPC port: 9774 TestNet P2P port: 19775 TestNet RPC port: 19774
Renesis Development Team : hav0k - 2 developers Group : The Renesis Group ( Visit www.renesis.io for profiles ) - 7 members Web Site: http://www.renesis.io Block Explorers: http://tx.renesis.io - https://protopool.net/exploreRESS Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/Renesis/ Connections: Discord, Telegram, Slack ( Visit www.renesis.io to connect ) Will have web wallet: No - We believe coins should be safe in your wallets not online. Pools: To be announced after announcement. Exchanges: To be announced.

Pools:

https://cryptopool.party 10000 RESS Reward TX : http://tx.renesis.io/address/RVMNvHD3DFH1CZ9JVijFxiZgKcPLBpteYh
https://protopool.net 10000 RESS Reward TX: http://tx.renesis.io/address/RATQNUpMH7puoByrkBBUWiBVJowno6bGPz
http://www.tera.tn/ 10000 RESS Reward TX: http://tx.renesis.io/address/RFUkDC5dyRQZhH3GkrAhnAUNNQ2tZbTt7w

Nodes:

addnode node1.renesis.io addnode node2.renesis.io addnode node3.renesis.io addnode node4.renesis.io addnode node5.renesis.io ( Node by CryptoHobo. 1K RESS every month . TXID : 1e7a332788bceb23438b783dac172c853804d51443f43a1d68b378447981059f - 22 July 2018 addnode i.crashed.online addnode he.crashed.online addnode it.crashed.online addnode she.crashed.online addnode renesisckko455xx.onion add ( Tor Node )
Terms & Conditions for GPUMiner Releases : Developers must release the mining software + source after brief testing to Renesis Group to claim their reward. The group will immediately upload the GPUMiner with sources on github after mining 2 test blocks and will provide proof to community. If GPUMiner software is released directly to the community then it would fair but there will be no reward for software developers.

Mining:

At the time of announcement, you can mine solo until pools become available. Download the CPUMiner binary or source from github with a wallet https://github.com/renesisgroup/cpuminer-release. Place the renesis.conf in your wallet data directory and (re) start wallet. Run start.bat file inside CPUMiner bin folder to mine Renesis. You can edit the start.bat file to edit the number of threads for mining. If you wish to mine on a pool then use the poolmine.bat file.
Note: Please be advised that the cpuminer.exe can show up as a virus on Windows just like almost all mining software. You can be assured it is not and is labelled as coin miner, CpuMiner (PUA) or malware. Refer to virustotal report here https://www.virustotal.com/#/file/1c90ca293dc016f0d8663f7bab55b5def8f484c21b3dac3dae6f81d0166cc99e/detection . You can safely verify your Claymore and EWBF CUDA miners at virustotal and they will give similar results. If you feel that it has a virus then please do not mine. Virustotal scan for Windows wallet is : https://www.virustotal.com/#/file/4cc5d6977566fc7e254744626d0783b1fc2d1aab15d72a5137c99ef0e91eee46/detection .For questions related to GPUMiner releases, please ask fellow miners or their respective developers when their releases become available for download.
UPDATE: CCMINER Download : https://github.com/renesisgroup/ccminer-renesis Reward of 50000 RESS paid to user A1 on Discord : http://tx.renesis.io/address/RVmFpemzMtbjhG16bjQTGEWv3sTgRVuzWm
Special thanks to mrM4D for his guidelines on CPUMiner build. Cheers to ocminer, mrM4D and Epsylon3 Greets to: SCRIV, RavenCoin for their game changing innovations and ASIC resistance commitments.

Roadmap:

Phase 1
Renesis Release Development - done CPUMiner Development - done Generate the premine - done Announcement - Underway Community Developers - 3 required and backed by funding from premine. Update: 1st Dev joined the dev team GPUMiners for AMD - Awaited and backed by rewards for fair release by developers. Masternodes Solution - TBA by developers and community consensus and backed by rewards from premine. ASIC Survey - Planned Rensis Hash Enhancement - Planned. TBA under phase 2 or after ASIC Survey Renesis Holdings Fund - Planned
Phase 2 - Next
Good things coming here =) Real use case 1 - Planned Real use case 2 - Planned To be announced after completion of Phase 1
Phase 3 - Planned
Online Gaming - Planned
Phase 4 - Planned
To be announced after completion of Phase 3
submitted by dev_hav0k to Renesis [link] [comments]

Uso del Full Node Wallet BTCP Bitcoin Private da Terminale Linux

In questo post voglio dimostrare alcuni utilizzi del Full Node Wallet Bitcoin Private da terminale Linux
AVVERTENZA:
Usate questo tutorial con un piccolo quantitativo di BTCP, nell'esempio utilizzo 0,01 BTCP, almeno fino a quando non vi sentite sicuri nell'uso dei comandi. Fate attenzione! I comandi vengono eseguiti senza possibilità di annullarli, salvo in casi eccezionali, quindi fate tutto a vostro rischio.
PREMESSA:
Il wallet è già stato installato sul vostro PC o in un server Cloud usando le seguenti istruzioni:https://github.com/BTCPrivate/bitcoinprivate
Io uso una Ubuntu 16.04 LTS 64bit, ma i comandi sono simili anche per la distribuzione Windows.
Andrebbe anche aperta la porta TCP 7932 per avere un wallet perfettamente funzionante, ma ho fatto le prove senza aprirla.
Come attivare il firewall:
sudo ufw status
Please note: Make sure you enter the code in this order! If you do not, the program will not work! (If need be you can disable your firewall by entering: sudo ufw disable)
sudo ufw default allow outgoing sudo ufw default deny incoming sudo ufw allow ssh/tcp sudo ufw limit ssh/tcp sudo ufw allow http/tcp sudo ufw allow https/tcp sudo ufw allow 7932/tcp sudo ufw logging on sudo ufw enable
Apri un nuovo terminale troverai il prompt dei comandi, il mio è così, ma potrebbe essere differente:
[email protected]:~$ 
Scrivi quello che segue e premi invio:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcpd --daemon 
dovrebbe apparire il seguente messaggio:
BTCP Server Starting 
Questo significa che hai avviato il server (full node wallet) in modalità daemon, silenziosa. Per fermarlo scrivi:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli stop 
Otterrai la risposta:
BTCP server stopping 
Puoi anche avviare il wallet in una finestra del terminale e vederlo lavorare, anzichè usare il comando --daemon
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcpd 
Vedreai apparire un logo del BTCP formato da tanti caratteri e la seguente scritta:
Thank you for running a Bitcoin Private node! You're strengthening the network and contributing to a social good. To ensure you are fully protecting your privacy when running BTCP, see . Block height | 340079 Connections | 8 Network solution rate | 8359387 Sol/s You are currently not mining. To enable mining, add 'gen=1' to your btcprivate.conf and restart. Since starting this node 1 minutes, 33 seconds ago: - You have validated 695 transactions! [Press Ctrl+C to exit] [Set 'showmetrics=0' to hide] 
Block height è l'allineamento del wallet con la blockchain, richiede tempo perchè si allinei e scarichi tutta la blockchain, dipende dalla velocità del tuo collegamento e del tuo pc.Connections: 8 sono i nodi a cui è collegato il nostro wallet, che è un vero e proprio nodo.
Network solution rate è la "potenza" di tutta la rete di elaborare i blocchi in Sol/s
Con un full node puoi partecipare anche tu a rafforzare la rete, abilitando il mining. Si tratta di un solo mining, quindi le probabilità di risolvere un blocco sono veramente minime.
Per farlo basta aggiungere la voce gen=1 nel file btcprivate.conf
Proviamo a farlo. Blocchiamo il nodo con il comando CTRL + C e aspettiamo che appaia il prompt di comando.
Appena appare, inseriamo i seguenti comandi:
[email protected]:~$ cd .btcprivate [email protected]:~/.btcprivate$ ls 
ci siamo spostati nella directory nascosta (inizia per .) contenente i file di configurazione di BTCP, ls mostra i file contenuti:
blocks btcprivate.conf chainstate db.log debug.log fee_estimates.dat peers.dat wallet.dat 
puoi vedere il file btcprivate.conf e wallet.dat che è il file del wallet del nodo. Editiamo ora il file di configurazione, io uso PICO, un text editor per linux, ma potete usare anche vi se preferite:
[email protected]:~/.btcprivate$ pico btcprivate.conf 
inserite gen=1 in una riga vuota del file di configurazione e poi chiudete l'editor salvando con i comandi CTRL+X e Y
gen=1 
tornate nella directory home:
[email protected]:~/.btcprivate$ cd 
Fate riavviare il wallet con il comando:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcpd 
Otterrete il seguente output:
Block height | 340091 Connections | 8 Network solution rate | 8211926 Sol/s Local solution rate | 0.0075 Sol/s Since starting this node 8 minutes, 5 seconds ago: - You have validated 684 transactions! - You have completed 1 Equihash solver runs. You are mining with the default solver on 1 threads. 
Congratulazioni! State minando!
Ora diamo un occhiata al file wallet.dat
ATTENZIONE:
wallet.dat è il vostro wallet, se lo cancellate o lo riscrivete perderete tutti i BTCP che contiene. Consiglio di farne una copia ma attenzione: wallet.dat non è crittografato, quindi vi consiglio di crittografarlo prima di spostarlo dal PC: primo faccio una copia.
Bloccate nuovamente il wallet con CTRL+C
Al prompt scrivete:
[email protected]:~$ cd .btcprivate 
Poi copiate il file sul Desktop (scrivania) Sostituite la parola Desktop con Scrivania se avete installato Linux in Italiano
[email protected]:~/.btcprivate$ cp wallet.dat home/btcp/Desktop/wallet_btcp_back.dat 
Ora troverete il file wallet_btcp_back.dat sulla scrivania, crittografatelo AES256 usando il gestore degli archivi GUI e impostando una password resistente. Per verificare che tutto funzioni, vi consiglio di fare una altra copia di wallet.dat, estrarre il file dall'archivio crittato e sostituirlo al wallet.dat. se tutto funziona siete a posto. Se non siete sicuri non fate nulla e non usate questo wallet per mettere i vostri BTCP, ma nolo per scopi didattici con pochi spiccioli. E' facile fare errori e perdere tutto.
Tornate alla directory home e riavviate il server in daemon mode.
proviamo alcuni comandi usando il client: btcp-cli
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli help 
Se tutto funziona correttamente vi risponderà con la lista di tutti i comandi disponibili:
z_exportwallet "filename" z_getbalance "address" ( minconf ) z_getnewaddress z_getoperationresult (["operationid", ... ]) z_getoperationstatus (["operationid", ... ]) z_gettotalbalance ( minconf ) z_importkey "zkey" ( rescan startHeight ) z_importwallet "filename" z_listaddresses z_listoperationids z_listreceivedbyaddress "address" ( minconf ) z_sendmany "fromaddress" [{"address":... ,"amount":...},...] ( minconf ) ( fee ) z_shieldcoinbase "fromaddress" "tozaddress" ( fee ) zcbenchmark benchmarktype samplecount zcrawjoinsplit rawtx inputs outputs vpub_old vpub_new zcrawkeygen zcrawreceive zcsecretkey encryptednote zcsamplejoinsplit [email protected]:~$ 
Benissimo! Ora proviamo ad usare qualche comando, comunciamo con getinfo
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getinfo 
Risposta:
{ "version": 1001251, "protocolversion": 180004, "walletversion": 60000, "balance": 0.00000000, "blocks": 340074, "timeoffset": 0, "connections": 8, "proxy": "", "difficulty": 167290.7158221716, "testnet": false, "keypoololdest": 1528833903, "keypoolsize": 101, "paytxfee": 0.00000000, "relayfee": 0.00000100, "errors": "" } [email protected]:~$ 
Nella risposta troverete alcune informazioni sul wallet, versione, block height, connections, balance = 0 ecc ecc
Proviamo ora getblockchaininfo:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getblockchaininfo 
Risposta:
{ "chain": "main", "blocks": 340074, "headers": 340074, "bestblockhash": "0000000145c0011d8e914f4ba68d1443c7ae0dd15bdf0bc300994dd5282710aa", "difficulty": 165971.1181999981, "verificationprogress": 0.9999992572690658, "chainwork": "0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000002e8314e4484da", "pruned": false, "commitments": 663480, 
La sincronizzazione in questo caso è terminata:"verificationprogress": 0.9999992572690658, (99,99999%)
Ora proviamo getwalletinfo
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getwalletinfo 
Risposta:
{ "walletversion": 60000, "balance": 0.00000000, "unconfirmed_balance": 0.00000000, "immature_balance": 0.00000000, "txcount": 0, "keypoololdest": 1528833903, "keypoolsize": 101, "paytxfee": 0.00000000 } [email protected]:~$ 
Proviamo a ricevere dei BTCP da un wallet esterno, per prima cosa abbiamo bisogno di un transparent address da comunicare a chi ci invia i BTCP. Lo otteniamo con il comando getnewaddress:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getnewaddress 
Risposta: otteniamo un indirizzo (le xxx le ho aggiunte per mascherarlo)
b1Cabjwvcce7N8ea9Gxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx [email protected]:~$ 
Inviate con un vostro wallet grafico o con electrum pochi BTCP, io ne ho mandati 0.01 per prova, dopo che li avete inviati, verificate se sono arrivati:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getwalletinfo 
Risposta:
{ "walletversion": 60000, "balance": 0.00000000, "unconfirmed_balance": 0.01000000, "immature_balance": 0.00000000, "txcount": 1, "keypoololdest": 1528833903, "keypoolsize": 101, "paytxfee": 0.00000000 } 
Arrivati ! "Unconfirmed balance" 0.01! non sono ancora confermati, quindi aspettate un po' e ripetete il comando:
"walletversion": 60000, "balance": 0.01000000, "unconfirmed_balance": 0.00000000, "immature_balance": 0.00000000, "txcount": 1, "keypoololdest": 1528833903, "keypoolsize": 101, "paytxfee": 0.00000000 
Adesso balance è 0.01 perfetto!
Proviamo adesso ad inviare questi BTCP ad un nuovo T-Address, per semplicità li invierò ad un indirizzo di questo wallet
Generiamo un nuovo indirizzo per riceverli:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getnewaddress 
Otteniamo:
b1Nb42GoK9kmsxxxxxxxxxxxxx 
copiamo l'indirizzo e usiamo il comando sendtoaddress "btcpaddress" amount ( "comment" "comment-to" subtractfeefromamount )
il parametro subtractfeefromamount puo' essere true or false a seconda se vogliamo che le fee vengano detratte dall'ammontare inviato o meno. Io invio tutto quanto al nuovo indirizzo e quindi le fee vanno dedotte da questo:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli sendtoaddress "b1Nb42GoK9kmsxxxxxxxxxxxxx" 0.01 "" "" true 
Risposta:
2c5d3d1a3b5eec414b721d3817487f53c5eebxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx [email protected]:~$ 
Controlliamo cosa è successo:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli getwalletinfo 
Risposta:
{ "walletversion": 60000, "balance": 0.00999808, "unconfirmed_balance": 0.00000000, "immature_balance": 0.00000000, "txcount": 2, "keypoololdest": 1528833903, "keypoolsize": 101, "paytxfee": 0.00000000 } 
Come vedete i BTCP sono diminuiti, perchè sono stati spostati su un nuovo indirizzo dello stesso wallet, pagando le fee. Ora vediamo esattamente dove sono e dove erano:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli listreceivedbyaddress 
Risposta:
[ { "address": "b1Ep2wi2tUnKf433Vaxxxxxxxxxxxx", "account": "", "amount": 0.01000000, "confirmations": 6, "txids": [ "833533440a13c09fda6e90d0c5xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx" ] }, { "address": "b1Nb42GoK9kmsVZ9KPxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx", "account": "", "amount": 0.00999808, "confirmations": 1, "txids": [ "2c5d3d1a3b5eec414b721d3817487f53c5xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx" ] } 
Questo comando vi da informazione di tutti gli indirizzi usati, vediamo solo gli indirizzi non spesi: listunspent
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli listunspent 
Risposta:
[ { "txid": "2c5d3d1a3b5eec414b721d381748xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx", "vout": 0, "generated": false, "address": "b1Nb42GoK9kxxxxxxxxxxxxxx", "account": "", "scriptPubKey": "76a914c6bdf3bc8aedxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx", "amount": 0.00999808, "confirmations": 6, "spendable": true 
Ottimo!
Ora possiamo provare un comando che ci permette di estrarre la chiave provata da un indirizzo pubblico. Questo puo' essete utile in occasione di Fork o Airdrop per estrarre le monete.
ATTENZIONE: esporre a terzi le chiavi private è rischioso. Potrebbero rubare tutto il contenuto. Fate molta attenzione. Estraete le private keys solo se necessario o per fare delle prove su indirizzi che contengono pochi spicci. In ogni caso, dopo aver usato la private key meglio non riutilizzare quell'indirizzo.
Il comando da utilizzare è dumpprivkey T-ADDRESS
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli dumpprivkey b1Ep2wi2tUnxxxxxxxxxxx 
L'output sarà tipo il seguente, al solito la chiave è mascherata con delle xxxxxx
Kz29e62Bmxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 
Ora proviamo lo swipe della chiave, cioè il wallet andrà a cercare nella blockchain tutti gli importi collegati a quella pvt key, : importprivkey "btcpprivkey" ( "label" rescan )
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli importprivkey "Kz29e62Bmxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx" "" true 
Ora proviamo a fare delle Shielded Transaction, queste transazioni utilizzano la tecnologia zk-Snark per mascherare importi e indirizzi. Per prima cosa dobbiamo ottenere un indirizzo Shielded dal nostro wallet.
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli z_getnewaddress 
Eccolo generato:
zkEvCiVwgHb3NFi2ee9HGPjno2xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 
Vediamo dove sono i nostri BTCP, al momento sono solo su indirizzi Transparent:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli z_gettotalbalance 
Answer:
{ "transparent": "0.00999808", "private": "0.00", "total": "0.00999808" } 
ora mandiamo qualche BTCP all'indirizzo z_address. Per prima cosa dobbiamo recuperare l'indirizzo t-address dove si trovano:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli listunspent 
Eccoli:
[ { "txid": "72f568d1ed51524b69f1xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx", "vout": 0, "generated": false, "address": "b1LDhxBJxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx", "scriptPubKey": "76axxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxe088xx", "amount": 0.00889808, "confirmations": 556, "spendable": true } ] 
Adesso mandiamo un po' di BTCP all'indirizzo Shielded che abbiamo ottenuto sopra. Il comando è abbastanza complicato ma funziona cosi':
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli z_sendmany "b1LDhxBJxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx" "[{\"amount\":0.001, \"address\":\"zkEvCiVwgHb3xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx\"}]" 
Risultato:
opid-xxxxxxx-36c4-xxxx-beb2-xxxxxxxxxxxx 
Una transazione zk-Snark è piuttosto pesante da elaborare, il mio vecchio PC ci mette un po'. Meglio disattivare processi inutili. Si puo' controllare se l'operazione è andata a buon fine:
[email protected]:~$ ./BitcoinPrivate/src/btcp-cli z_getoperationresult 
al termine dovreste ricevere il seguente output:
[ { "id": "opid-xxxxxx-xxxxx-4a5d-beb2-xxxxxxxxxx", "status": "success", "creation_time": 1529426885, "result": { "txid": "f87e8d5e96a8a0xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx" }, "execution_secs": 216.686332567, "method": "z_sendmany", "params": { "fromaddress": "b1LDhxxxxxxxxxxx", "amounts": [ { "amount": 0.001, "address": "zkEvCiVwgHb3NFxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxR" } ], "minconf": 1, "fee": 0.0001 } } ] 
Fatto! Sul mio vecchio PC ci sono voluti 216,68 secondi!
La prossima prova sarà un invio da indirizzo Shielded a Transparent.
Play with your full node wallet and have fun.Remember: these commands are almost the same in all the bitcoin based coins, so you also learnt how to use many other wallets!
submitted by xivan71 to u/xivan71 [link] [comments]

Setting up solo mining just targeting USB erupters? PC/Mac?

I am having trouble trying to get solo mining started on either my PC or Mac. I have a PC set up that is using three 7950s that are mining Litecoins. I'd like to have my 2 USB erupters solo mining Bitcoins for fun on the same system. I have the drivers installed for the USB miners and my system recognizes them.
I am starting Bitcoin-QT as -server
My bitcoin.conf looks like this: listen=1 server=1 rpcuser=user rpcpassword=pass
I set up a BFG .bat like this: bfgminer.exe -o 127.0.0.1:8332 -O -u user -p pass
When I launch that, BFG just crashes. I have also tried it with CGminer and that crashes also. I'd like to keep CGminer on the cards Litecoin mining and use BFG for the USB miners.
How do I get BFG to work just with the USBs? Also, do I need to input a Bitcoin address somewhere so if I did solve something I get the payout?
Sometimes, I do more work on my Mac and am also trying to set up the USBs to mine on a Mac using Diablo miner. Will that work the same way as the PC setup once we get it figured out?
Thanks for any help.
submitted by PoisonCoyote to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Core 0.10.0 released | Wladimir | Feb 16 2015

Wladimir on Feb 16 2015:
Bitcoin Core version 0.10.0 is now available from:
https://bitcoin.org/bin/0.10.0/
This is a new major version release, bringing both new features and
bug fixes.
Please report bugs using the issue tracker at github:
https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/issues
The whole distribution is also available as torrent:
https://bitcoin.org/bin/0.10.0/bitcoin-0.10.0.torrent
magnet:?xt=urn:btih:170c61fe09dafecfbb97cb4dccd32173383f4e68&dn;=0.10.0&tr;=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.openbittorrent.com%3A80%2Fannounce&tr;=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.publicbt.com%3A80%2Fannounce&tr;=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.ccc.de%3A80%2Fannounce&tr;=udp%3A%2F%2Ftracker.coppersurfer.tk%3A6969&tr;=udp%3A%2F%2Fopen.demonii.com%3A1337&ws;=https%3A%2F%2Fbitcoin.org%2Fbin%2F
Upgrading and downgrading

How to Upgrade
If you are running an older version, shut it down. Wait until it has completely
shut down (which might take a few minutes for older versions), then run the
installer (on Windows) or just copy over /Applications/Bitcoin-Qt (on Mac) or
bitcoind/bitcoin-qt (on Linux).
Downgrading warning
Because release 0.10.0 makes use of headers-first synchronization and parallel
block download (see further), the block files and databases are not
backwards-compatible with older versions of Bitcoin Core or other software:
  • Blocks will be stored on disk out of order (in the order they are
received, really), which makes it incompatible with some tools or
other programs. Reindexing using earlier versions will also not work
anymore as a result of this.
  • The block index database will now hold headers for which no block is
stored on disk, which earlier versions won't support.
If you want to be able to downgrade smoothly, make a backup of your entire data
directory. Without this your node will need start syncing (or importing from
bootstrap.dat) anew afterwards. It is possible that the data from a completely
synchronised 0.10 node may be usable in older versions as-is, but this is not
supported and may break as soon as the older version attempts to reindex.
This does not affect wallet forward or backward compatibility.
Notable changes

Faster synchronization
Bitcoin Core now uses 'headers-first synchronization'. This means that we first
ask peers for block headers (a total of 27 megabytes, as of December 2014) and
validate those. In a second stage, when the headers have been discovered, we
download the blocks. However, as we already know about the whole chain in
advance, the blocks can be downloaded in parallel from all available peers.
In practice, this means a much faster and more robust synchronization. On
recent hardware with a decent network link, it can be as little as 3 hours
for an initial full synchronization. You may notice a slower progress in the
very first few minutes, when headers are still being fetched and verified, but
it should gain speed afterwards.
A few RPCs were added/updated as a result of this:
  • getblockchaininfo now returns the number of validated headers in addition to
the number of validated blocks.
  • getpeerinfo lists both the number of blocks and headers we know we have in
common with each peer. While synchronizing, the heights of the blocks that we
have requested from peers (but haven't received yet) are also listed as
'inflight'.
  • A new RPC getchaintips lists all known branches of the block chain,
including those we only have headers for.
Transaction fee changes
This release automatically estimates how high a transaction fee (or how
high a priority) transactions require to be confirmed quickly. The default
settings will create transactions that confirm quickly; see the new
'txconfirmtarget' setting to control the tradeoff between fees and
confirmation times. Fees are added by default unless the 'sendfreetransactions'
setting is enabled.
Prior releases used hard-coded fees (and priorities), and would
sometimes create transactions that took a very long time to confirm.
Statistics used to estimate fees and priorities are saved in the
data directory in the fee_estimates.dat file just before
program shutdown, and are read in at startup.
New command line options for transaction fee changes:
  • -txconfirmtarget=n : create transactions that have enough fees (or priority)
so they are likely to begin confirmation within n blocks (default: 1). This setting
is over-ridden by the -paytxfee option.
  • -sendfreetransactions : Send transactions as zero-fee transactions if possible
(default: 0)
New RPC commands for fee estimation:
  • estimatefee nblocks : Returns approximate fee-per-1,000-bytes needed for
a transaction to begin confirmation within nblocks. Returns -1 if not enough
transactions have been observed to compute a good estimate.
  • estimatepriority nblocks : Returns approximate priority needed for
a zero-fee transaction to begin confirmation within nblocks. Returns -1 if not
enough free transactions have been observed to compute a good
estimate.
RPC access control changes
Subnet matching for the purpose of access control is now done
by matching the binary network address, instead of with string wildcard matching.
For the user this means that -rpcallowip takes a subnet specification, which can be
  • a single IP address (e.g. 1.2.3.4 or fe80::0012:3456:789a:bcde)
  • a network/CIDR (e.g. 1.2.3.0/24 or fe80::0000/64)
  • a network/netmask (e.g. 1.2.3.4/255.255.255.0 or fe80::0012:3456:789a:bcde/ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff:ffff)
An arbitrary number of -rpcallow arguments can be given. An incoming connection will be accepted if its origin address
matches one of them.
For example:
| 0.9.x and before | 0.10.x |
|--------------------------------------------|---------------------------------------|
| -rpcallowip=192.168.1.1 | -rpcallowip=192.168.1.1 (unchanged) |
| -rpcallowip=192.168.1.* | -rpcallowip=192.168.1.0/24 |
| -rpcallowip=192.168.* | -rpcallowip=192.168.0.0/16 |
| -rpcallowip=* (dangerous!) | -rpcallowip=::/0 (still dangerous!) |
Using wildcards will result in the rule being rejected with the following error in debug.log:
 Error: Invalid -rpcallowip subnet specification: *. Valid are a single IP (e.g. 1.2.3.4), a network/netmask (e.g. 1.2.3.4/255.255.255.0) or a network/CIDR (e.g. 1.2.3.4/24). 
REST interface
A new HTTP API is exposed when running with the -rest flag, which allows
unauthenticated access to public node data.
It is served on the same port as RPC, but does not need a password, and uses
plain HTTP instead of JSON-RPC.
Assuming a local RPC server running on port 8332, it is possible to request:
In every case, EXT can be bin (for raw binary data), hex (for hex-encoded
binary) or json.
For more details, see the doc/REST-interface.md document in the repository.
RPC Server "Warm-Up" Mode
The RPC server is started earlier now, before most of the expensive
intialisations like loading the block index. It is available now almost
immediately after starting the process. However, until all initialisations
are done, it always returns an immediate error with code -28 to all calls.
This new behaviour can be useful for clients to know that a server is already
started and will be available soon (for instance, so that they do not
have to start it themselves).
Improved signing security
For 0.10 the security of signing against unusual attacks has been
improved by making the signatures constant time and deterministic.
This change is a result of switching signing to use libsecp256k1
instead of OpenSSL. Libsecp256k1 is a cryptographic library
optimized for the curve Bitcoin uses which was created by Bitcoin
Core developer Pieter Wuille.
There exist attacks[1] against most ECC implementations where an
attacker on shared virtual machine hardware could extract a private
key if they could cause a target to sign using the same key hundreds
of times. While using shared hosts and reusing keys are inadvisable
for other reasons, it's a better practice to avoid the exposure.
OpenSSL has code in their source repository for derandomization
and reduction in timing leaks that we've eagerly wanted to use for a
long time, but this functionality has still not made its
way into a released version of OpenSSL. Libsecp256k1 achieves
significantly stronger protection: As far as we're aware this is
the only deployed implementation of constant time signing for
the curve Bitcoin uses and we have reason to believe that
libsecp256k1 is better tested and more thoroughly reviewed
than the implementation in OpenSSL.
[1] https://eprint.iacr.org/2014/161.pdf
Watch-only wallet support
The wallet can now track transactions to and from wallets for which you know
all addresses (or scripts), even without the private keys.
This can be used to track payments without needing the private keys online on a
possibly vulnerable system. In addition, it can help for (manual) construction
of multisig transactions where you are only one of the signers.
One new RPC, importaddress, is added which functions similarly to
importprivkey, but instead takes an address or script (in hexadecimal) as
argument. After using it, outputs credited to this address or script are
considered to be received, and transactions consuming these outputs will be
considered to be sent.
The following RPCs have optional support for watch-only:
getbalance, listreceivedbyaddress, listreceivedbyaccount,
listtransactions, listaccounts, listsinceblock, gettransaction. See the
RPC documentation for those methods for more information.
Compared to using getrawtransaction, this mechanism does not require
-txindex, scales better, integrates better with the wallet, and is compatible
with future block chain pruning functionality. It does mean that all relevant
addresses need to added to the wallet before the payment, though.
Consensus library
Starting from 0.10.0, the Bitcoin Core distribution includes a consensus library.
The purpose of this library is to make the verification functionality that is
critical to Bitcoin's consensus available to other applications, e.g. to language
bindings such as [python-bitcoinlib](https://pypi.python.org/pypi/python-bitcoinlib) or
alternative node implementations.
This library is called libbitcoinconsensus.so (or, .dll for Windows).
Its interface is defined in the C header [bitcoinconsensus.h](https://github.com/bitcoin/bitcoin/blob/0.10/src/script/bitcoinconsensus.h).
In its initial version the API includes two functions:
  • bitcoinconsensus_verify_script verifies a script. It returns whether the indicated input of the provided serialized transaction
correctly spends the passed scriptPubKey under additional constraints indicated by flags
  • bitcoinconsensus_version returns the API version, currently at an experimental 0
The functionality is planned to be extended to e.g. UTXO management in upcoming releases, but the interface
for existing methods should remain stable.
Standard script rules relaxed for P2SH addresses
The IsStandard() rules have been almost completely removed for P2SH
redemption scripts, allowing applications to make use of any valid
script type, such as "n-of-m OR y", hash-locked oracle addresses, etc.
While the Bitcoin protocol has always supported these types of script,
actually using them on mainnet has been previously inconvenient as
standard Bitcoin Core nodes wouldn't relay them to miners, nor would
most miners include them in blocks they mined.
bitcoin-tx
It has been observed that many of the RPC functions offered by bitcoind are
"pure functions", and operate independently of the bitcoind wallet. This
included many of the RPC "raw transaction" API functions, such as
createrawtransaction.
bitcoin-tx is a newly introduced command line utility designed to enable easy
manipulation of bitcoin transactions. A summary of its operation may be
obtained via "bitcoin-tx --help" Transactions may be created or signed in a
manner similar to the RPC raw tx API. Transactions may be updated, deleting
inputs or outputs, or appending new inputs and outputs. Custom scripts may be
easily composed using a simple text notation, borrowed from the bitcoin test
suite.
This tool may be used for experimenting with new transaction types, signing
multi-party transactions, and many other uses. Long term, the goal is to
deprecate and remove "pure function" RPC API calls, as those do not require a
server round-trip to execute.
Other utilities "bitcoin-key" and "bitcoin-script" have been proposed, making
key and script operations easily accessible via command line.
Mining and relay policy enhancements
Bitcoin Core's block templates are now for version 3 blocks only, and any mining
software relying on its getblocktemplate must be updated in parallel to use
libblkmaker either version 0.4.2 or any version from 0.5.1 onward.
If you are solo mining, this will affect you the moment you upgrade Bitcoin
Core, which must be done prior to BIP66 achieving its 951/1001 status.
If you are mining with the stratum mining protocol: this does not affect you.
If you are mining with the getblocktemplate protocol to a pool: this will affect
you at the pool operator's discretion, which must be no later than BIP66
achieving its 951/1001 status.
The prioritisetransaction RPC method has been added to enable miners to
manipulate the priority of transactions on an individual basis.
Bitcoin Core now supports BIP 22 long polling, so mining software can be
notified immediately of new templates rather than having to poll periodically.
Support for BIP 23 block proposals is now available in Bitcoin Core's
getblocktemplate method. This enables miners to check the basic validity of
their next block before expending work on it, reducing risks of accidental
hardforks or mining invalid blocks.
Two new options to control mining policy:
  • -datacarrier=0/1 : Relay and mine "data carrier" (OP_RETURN) transactions
if this is 1.
  • -datacarriersize=n : Maximum size, in bytes, we consider acceptable for
"data carrier" outputs.
The relay policy has changed to more properly implement the desired behavior of not
relaying free (or very low fee) transactions unless they have a priority above the
AllowFreeThreshold(), in which case they are relayed subject to the rate limiter.
BIP 66: strict DER encoding for signatures
Bitcoin Core 0.10 implements BIP 66, which introduces block version 3, and a new
consensus rule, which prohibits non-DER signatures. Such transactions have been
non-standard since Bitcoin v0.8.0 (released in February 2013), but were
technically still permitted inside blocks.
This change breaks the dependency on OpenSSL's signature parsing, and is
required if implementations would want to remove all of OpenSSL from the
consensus code.
The same miner-voting mechanism as in BIP 34 is used: when 751 out of a
sequence of 1001 blocks have version number 3 or higher, the new consensus
rule becomes active for those blocks. When 951 out of a sequence of 1001
blocks have version number 3 or higher, it becomes mandatory for all blocks.
Backward compatibility with current mining software is NOT provided, thus miners
should read the first paragraph of "Mining and relay policy enhancements" above.
0.10.0 Change log

Detailed release notes follow. This overview includes changes that affect external
behavior, not code moves, refactors or string updates.
RPC:
  • f923c07 Support IPv6 lookup in bitcoin-cli even when IPv6 only bound on localhost
  • b641c9c Fix addnode "onetry": Connect with OpenNetworkConnection
  • 171ca77 estimatefee / estimatepriority RPC methods
  • b750cf1 Remove cli functionality from bitcoind
  • f6984e8 Add "chain" to getmininginfo, improve help in getblockchaininfo
  • 99ddc6c Add nLocalServices info to RPC getinfo
  • cf0c47b Remove getwork() RPC call
  • 2a72d45 prioritisetransaction
  • e44fea5 Add an option -datacarrier to allow users to disable relaying/mining data carrier transactions
  • 2ec5a3d Prevent easy RPC memory exhaustion attack
  • d4640d7 Added argument to getbalance to include watchonly addresses and fixed errors in balance calculation
  • 83f3543 Added argument to listaccounts to include watchonly addresses
  • 952877e Showing 'involvesWatchonly' property for transactions returned by 'listtransactions' and 'listsinceblock'. It is only appended when the transaction involves a watchonly address
  • d7d5d23 Added argument to listtransactions and listsinceblock to include watchonly addresses
  • f87ba3d added includeWatchonly argument to 'gettransaction' because it affects balance calculation
  • 0fa2f88 added includedWatchonly argument to listreceivedbyaddress/...account
  • 6c37f7f getrawchangeaddress: fail when keypool exhausted and wallet locked
  • ff6a7af getblocktemplate: longpolling support
  • c4a321f Add peerid to getpeerinfo to allow correlation with the logs
  • 1b4568c Add vout to ListTransactions output
  • b33bd7a Implement "getchaintips" RPC command to monitor blockchain forks
  • 733177e Remove size limit in RPC client, keep it in server
  • 6b5b7cb Categorize rpc help overview
  • 6f2c26a Closely track mempool byte total. Add "getmempoolinfo" RPC
  • aa82795 Add detailed network info to getnetworkinfo RPC
  • 01094bd Don't reveal whether password is <20 or >20 characters in RPC
  • 57153d4 rpc: Compute number of confirmations of a block from block height
  • ff36cbe getnetworkinfo: export local node's client sub-version string
  • d14d7de SanitizeString: allow '(' and ')'
  • 31d6390 Fixed setaccount accepting foreign address
  • b5ec5fe update getnetworkinfo help with subversion
  • ad6e601 RPC additions after headers-first
  • 33dfbf5 rpc: Fix leveldb iterator leak, and flush before gettxoutsetinfo
  • 2aa6329 Enable customising node policy for datacarrier data size with a -datacarriersize option
  • f877aaa submitblock: Use a temporary CValidationState to determine accurately the outcome of ProcessBlock
  • e69a587 submitblock: Support for returning specific rejection reasons
  • af82884 Add "warmup mode" for RPC server
  • e2655e0 Add unauthenticated HTTP REST interface to public blockchain data
  • 683dc40 Disable SSLv3 (in favor of TLS) for the RPC client and server
  • 44b4c0d signrawtransaction: validate private key
  • 9765a50 Implement BIP 23 Block Proposal
  • f9de17e Add warning comment to getinfo
Command-line options:
  • ee21912 Use netmasks instead of wildcards for IP address matching
  • deb3572 Add -rpcbind option to allow binding RPC port on a specific interface
  • 96b733e Add -version option to get just the version
  • 1569353 Add -stopafterblockimport option
  • 77cbd46 Let -zapwallettxes recover transaction meta data
  • 1c750db remove -tor compatibility code (only allow -onion)
  • 4aaa017 rework help messages for fee-related options
  • 4278b1d Clarify error message when invalid -rpcallowip
  • 6b407e4 -datadir is now allowed in config files
  • bdd5b58 Add option -sysperms to disable 077 umask (create new files with system default umask)
  • cbe39a3 Add "bitcoin-tx" command line utility and supporting modules
  • dbca89b Trigger -alertnotify if network is upgrading without you
  • ad96e7c Make -reindex cope with out-of-order blocks
  • 16d5194 Skip reindexed blocks individually
  • ec01243 --tracerpc option for regression tests
  • f654f00 Change -genproclimit default to 1
  • 3c77714 Make -proxy set all network types, avoiding a connect leak
  • 57be955 Remove -printblock, -printblocktree, and -printblockindex
  • ad3d208 remove -maxorphanblocks config parameter since it is no longer functional
Block and transaction handling:
  • 7a0e84d ProcessGetData(): abort if a block file is missing from disk
  • 8c93bf4 LoadBlockIndexDB(): Require block db reindex if any blk*.dat files are missing
  • 77339e5 Get rid of the static chainMostWork (optimization)
  • 4e0eed8 Allow ActivateBestChain to release its lock on cs_main
  • 18e7216 Push cs_mains down in ProcessBlock
  • fa126ef Avoid undefined behavior using CFlatData in CScript serialization
  • 7f3b4e9 Relax IsStandard rules for pay-to-script-hash transactions
  • c9a0918 Add a skiplist to the CBlockIndex structure
  • bc42503 Use unordered_map for CCoinsViewCache with salted hash (optimization)
  • d4d3fbd Do not flush the cache after every block outside of IBD (optimization)
  • ad08d0b Bugfix: make CCoinsViewMemPool support pruned entries in underlying cache
  • 5734d4d Only remove actualy failed blocks from setBlockIndexValid
  • d70bc52 Rework block processing benchmark code
  • 714a3e6 Only keep setBlockIndexValid entries that are possible improvements
  • ea100c7 Reduce maximum coinscache size during verification (reduce memory usage)
  • 4fad8e6 Reject transactions with excessive numbers of sigops
  • b0875eb Allow BatchWrite to destroy its input, reducing copying (optimization)
  • 92bb6f2 Bypass reloading blocks from disk (optimization)
  • 2e28031 Perform CVerifyDB on pcoinsdbview instead of pcoinsTip (reduce memory usage)
  • ab15b2e Avoid copying undo data (optimization)
  • 341735e Headers-first synchronization
  • afc32c5 Fix rebuild-chainstate feature and improve its performance
  • e11b2ce Fix large reorgs
  • ed6d1a2 Keep information about all block files in memory
  • a48f2d6 Abstract context-dependent block checking from acceptance
  • 7e615f5 Fixed mempool sync after sending a transaction
  • 51ce901 Improve chainstate/blockindex disk writing policy
  • a206950 Introduce separate flushing modes
  • 9ec75c5 Add a locking mechanism to IsInitialBlockDownload to ensure it never goes from false to true
  • 868d041 Remove coinbase-dependant transactions during reorg
  • 723d12c Remove txn which are invalidated by coinbase maturity during reorg
  • 0cb8763 Check against MANDATORY flags prior to accepting to mempool
  • 8446262 Reject headers that build on an invalid parent
  • 008138c Bugfix: only track UTXO modification after lookup
P2P protocol and network code:
  • f80cffa Do not trigger a DoS ban if SCRIPT_VERIFY_NULLDUMMY fails
  • c30329a Add testnet DNS seed of Alex Kotenko
  • 45a4baf Add testnet DNS seed of Andreas Schildbach
  • f1920e8 Ping automatically every 2 minutes (unconditionally)
  • 806fd19 Allocate receive buffers in on the fly
  • 6ecf3ed Display unknown commands received
  • aa81564 Track peers' available blocks
  • caf6150 Use async name resolving to improve net thread responsiveness
  • 9f4da19 Use pong receive time rather than processing time
  • 0127a9b remove SOCKS4 support from core and GUI, use SOCKS5
  • 40f5cb8 Send rejects and apply DoS scoring for errors in direct block validation
  • dc942e6 Introduce whitelisted peers
  • c994d2e prevent SOCKET leak in BindListenPort()
  • a60120e Add built-in seeds for .onion
  • 60dc8e4 Allow -onlynet=onion to be used
  • 3a56de7 addrman: Do not propagate obviously poor addresses onto the network
  • 6050ab6 netbase: Make SOCKS5 negotiation interruptible
  • 604ee2a Remove tx from AlreadyAskedFor list once we receive it, not when we process it
  • efad808 Avoid reject message feedback loops
  • 71697f9 Separate protocol versioning from clientversion
  • 20a5f61 Don't relay alerts to peers before version negotiation
  • b4ee0bd Introduce preferred download peers
  • 845c86d Do not use third party services for IP detection
  • 12a49ca Limit the number of new addressses to accumulate
  • 35e408f Regard connection failures as attempt for addrman
  • a3a7317 Introduce 10 minute block download timeout
  • 3022e7d Require sufficent priority for relay of free transactions
  • 58fda4d Update seed IPs, based on bitcoin.sipa.be crawler data
  • 18021d0 Remove bitnodes.io from dnsseeds.
Validation:
  • 6fd7ef2 Also switch the (unused) verification code to low-s instead of even-s
  • 584a358 Do merkle root and txid duplicates check simultaneously
  • 217a5c9 When transaction outputs exceed inputs, show the offending amounts so as to aid debugging
  • f74fc9b Print input index when signature validation fails, to aid debugging
  • 6fd59ee script.h: set_vch() should shift a >32 bit value
  • d752ba8 Add SCRIPT_VERIFY_SIGPUSHONLY (BIP62 rule 2) (test only)
  • 698c6ab Add SCRIPT_VERIFY_MINIMALDATA (BIP62 rules 3 and 4) (test only)
  • ab9edbd script: create sane error return codes for script validation and remove logging
  • 219a147 script: check ScriptError values in script tests
  • 0391423 Discourage NOPs reserved for soft-fork upgrades
  • 98b135f Make STRICTENC invalid pubkeys fail the script rather than the opcode
  • 307f7d4 Report script evaluation failures in log and reject messages
  • ace39db consensus: guard against openssl's new strict DER checks
  • 12b7c44 Improve robustness of DER recoding code
  • 76ce5c8 fail immediately on an empty signature
Build system:
  • f25e3ad Fix build in OS X 10.9
  • 65e8ba4 build: Switch to non-recursive make
  • 460b32d build: fix broken boost chrono check on some platforms
  • 9ce0774 build: Fix windows configure when using --with-qt-libdir
  • ea96475 build: Add mention of --disable-wallet to bdb48 error messages
  • 1dec09b depends: add shared dependency builder
  • c101c76 build: Add --with-utils (bitcoin-cli and bitcoin-tx, default=yes). Help string consistency tweaks. Target sanity check fix
  • e432a5f build: add option for reducing exports (v2)
  • 6134b43 Fixing condition 'sabotaging' MSVC build
  • af0bd5e osx: fix signing to make Gatekeeper happy (again)
  • a7d1f03 build: fix dynamic boost check when --with-boost= is used
  • d5fd094 build: fix qt test build when libprotobuf is in a non-standard path
  • 2cf5f16 Add libbitcoinconsensus library
  • 914868a build: add a deterministic dmg signer
  • 2d375fe depends: bump openssl to 1.0.1k
  • b7a4ecc Build: Only check for boost when building code that requires it
Wallet:
  • b33d1f5 Use fee/priority estimates in wallet CreateTransaction
  • 4b7b1bb Sanity checks for estimates
  • c898846 Add support for watch-only addresses
  • d5087d1 Use script matching rather than destination matching for watch-only
  • d88af56 Fee fixes
  • a35b55b Dont run full check every time we decrypt wallet
  • 3a7c348 Fix make_change to not create half-satoshis
  • f606bb9 fix a possible memory leak in CWalletDB::Recover
  • 870da77 fix possible memory leaks in CWallet::EncryptWallet
  • ccca27a Watch-only fixes
  • 9b1627d [Wallet] Reduce minTxFee for transaction creation to 1000 satoshis
  • a53fd41 Deterministic signing
  • 15ad0b5 Apply AreSane() checks to the fees from the network
  • 11855c1 Enforce minRelayTxFee on wallet created tx and add a maxtxfee option
GUI:
  • c21c74b osx: Fix missing dock menu with qt5
  • b90711c Fix Transaction details shows wrong To:
  • 516053c Make links in 'About Bitcoin Core' clickable
  • bdc83e8 Ensure payment request network matches client network
  • 65f78a1 Add GUI view of peer information
  • 06a91d9 VerifyDB progress reporting
  • fe6bff2 Add BerkeleyDB version info to RPCConsole
  • b917555 PeerTableModel: Fix potential deadlock. #4296
  • dff0e3b Improve rpc console history behavior
  • 95a9383 Remove CENT-fee-rule from coin control completely
  • 56b07d2 Allow setting listen via GUI
  • d95ba75 Log messages with type>QtDebugMsg as non-debug
  • 8969828 New status bar Unit Display Control and related changes
  • 674c070 seed OpenSSL PNRG with Windows event data
  • 509f926 Payment request parsing on startup now only changes network if a valid network name is specified
  • acd432b Prevent balloon-spam after rescan
  • 7007402 Implement SI-style (thin space) thoudands separator
  • 91cce17 Use fixed-point arithmetic in amount spinbox
  • bdba2dd Remove an obscure option no-one cares about
  • bd0aa10 Replace the temporary file hack currently used to change Bitcoin-Qt's dock icon (OS X) with a buffer-based solution
  • 94e1b9e Re-work overviewpage UI
  • 8bfdc9a Better looking trayicon
  • b197bf3 disable tray interactions when client model set to 0
  • 1c5f0af Add column Watch-only to transactions list
  • 21f139b Fix tablet crash. closes #4854
  • e84843c Broken addresses on command line no longer trigger testnet
  • a49f11d Change splash screen to normal window
  • 1f9be98 Disable App Nap on OSX 10.9+
  • 27c3e91 Add proxy to options overridden if necessary
  • 4bd1185 Allow "emergency" shutdown during startup
  • d52f072 Don't show wallet options in the preferences menu when running with -disablewallet
  • 6093aa1 Qt: QProgressBar CPU-Issue workaround
  • 0ed9675 [Wallet] Add global boolean whether to send free transactions (default=true)
  • ed3e5e4 [Wallet] Add global boolean whether to pay at least the custom fee (default=true)
  • e7876b2 [Wallet] Prevent user from paying a non-sense fee
  • c1c9d5b Add Smartfee to GUI
  • e0a25c5 Make askpassphrase dialog behave more sanely
  • 94b362d On close of splashscreen interrupt verifyDB
  • b790d13 English translation update
  • 8543b0d Correct tooltip on address book page
Tests:
  • b41e594 Fix script test handling of empty scripts
  • d3a33fc Test CHECKMULTISIG with m == 0 and n == 0
  • 29c1749 Let tx (in)valid tests use any SCRIPT_VERIFY flag
  • 6380180 Add rejection of non-null CHECKMULTISIG dummy values
  • 21bf3d2 Add tests for BoostAsioToCNetAddr
  • b5ad5e7 Add Python test for -rpcbind and -rpcallowip
  • 9ec0306 Add CODESEPARATOFindAndDelete() tests
  • 75ebced Added many rpc wallet tests
  • 0193fb8 Allow multiple regression tests to run at once
  • 92a6220 Hook up sanity checks
  • 3820e01 Extend and move all crypto tests to crypto_tests.cpp
  • 3f9a019 added list/get received by address/ account tests
  • a90689f Remove timing-based signature cache unit test
  • 236982c Add skiplist unit tests
  • f4b00be Add CChain::GetLocator() unit test
  • b45a6e8 Add test for getblocktemplate longpolling
  • cdf305e Set -discover=0 in regtest framework
  • ed02282 additional test for OP_SIZE in script_valid.json
  • 0072d98 script tests: BOOLAND, BOOLOR decode to integer
  • 833ff16 script tests: values that overflow to 0 are true
  • 4cac5db script tests: value with trailing 0x00 is true
  • 89101c6 script test: test case for 5-byte bools
  • d2d9dc0 script tests: add tests for CHECKMULTISIG limits
  • d789386 Add "it works" test for bitcoin-tx
  • df4d61e Add bitcoin-tx tests
  • aa41ac2 Test IsPushOnly() with invalid push
  • 6022b5d Make script_{valid,invalid}.json validation flags configurable
  • 8138cbe Add automatic script test generation, and actual checksig tests
  • ed27e53 Add coins_tests with a large randomized CCoinViewCache test
  • 9df9cf5 Make SCRIPT_VERIFY_STRICTENC compatible with BIP62
  • dcb9846 Extend getchaintips RPC test
  • 554147a Ensure MINIMALDATA invalid tests can only fail one way
  • dfeec18 Test every numeric-accepting opcode for correct handling of the numeric minimal encoding rule
  • 2b62e17 Clearly separate PUSHDATA and numeric argument MINIMALDATA tests
  • 16d78bd Add valid invert of invalid every numeric opcode tests
  • f635269 tests: enable alertnotify test for Windows
  • 7a41614 tests: allow rpc-tests to get filenames for bitcoind and bitcoin-cli from the environment
  • 5122ea7 tests: fix forknotify.py on windows
  • fa7f8cd tests: remove old pull-tester scripts
  • 7667850 tests: replace the old (unused since Travis) tests with new rpc test scripts
  • f4e0aef Do signature-s negation inside the tests
  • 1837987 Optimize -regtest setgenerate block generation
  • 2db4c8a Fix node ranges in the test framework
  • a8b2ce5 regression test only setmocktime RPC call
  • daf03e7 RPC tests: create initial chain with specific timestamps
  • 8656dbb Port/fix txnmall.sh regression test
  • ca81587 Test the exact order of CHECKMULTISIG sig/pubkey evaluation
  • 7357893 Prioritize and display -testsafemode status in UI
  • f321d6b Add key generation/verification to ECC sanity check
  • 132ea9b miner_tests: Disable checkpoints so they don't fail the subsidy-change test
  • bc6cb41 QA RPC tests: Add tests block block proposals
  • f67a9ce Use deterministically generated script tests
  • 11d7a7d [RPC] add rpc-test for http keep-alive (persistent connections)
  • 34318d7 RPC-test based on invalidateblock for mempool coinbase spends
  • 76ec867 Use actually valid transactions for script tests
  • c8589bf Add actual signature tests
  • e2677d7 Fix smartfees test for change to relay policy
  • 263b65e tests: run sanity checks in tests too
Miscellaneous:
  • 122549f Fix incorrect checkpoint data for testnet3
  • 5bd02cf Log used config file to debug.log on startup
  • 68ba85f Updated Debian example bitcoin.conf with config from wiki + removed some cruft and updated comments
  • e5ee8f0 Remove -beta suffix
  • 38405ac Add comment regarding experimental-use service bits
  • be873f6 Issue warning if collecting RandSeed data failed
  • 8ae973c Allocate more space if necessary in RandSeedAddPerfMon
  • 675bcd5 Correct comment for 15-of-15 p2sh script size
  • fda3fed libsecp256k1 integration
  • 2e36866 Show nodeid instead of addresses in log (for anonymity) unless otherwise requested
  • cd01a5e Enable paranoid corruption checks in LevelDB >= 1.16
  • 9365937 Add comment about never updating nTimeOffset past 199 samples
  • 403c1bf contrib: remove getwork-based pyminer (as getwork API call has been removed)
  • 0c3e101 contrib: Added systemd .service file in order to help distributions integrate bitcoind
  • 0a0878d doc: Add new DNSseed policy
  • 2887bff Update coding style and add .clang-format
  • 5cbda4f Changed LevelDB cursors to use scoped pointers to ensure destruction when going out of scope
  • b4a72a7 contrib/linearize: split output files based on new-timestamp-year or max-file-size
  • e982b57 Use explicit fflush() instead of setvbuf()
  • 234bfbf contrib: Add init scripts and docs for Upstart and OpenRC
  • 01c2807 Add warning about the merkle-tree algorithm duplicate txid flaw
  • d6712db Also create pid file in non-daemon mode
  • 772ab0e contrib: use batched JSON-RPC in linarize-hashes (optimization)
  • 7ab4358 Update bash-completion for v0.10
  • 6e6a36c contrib: show pull # in prompt for github-merge script
  • 5b9f842 Upgrade leveldb to 1.18, make chainstate databases compatible between ARM and x86 (issue #2293)
  • 4e7c219 Catch UTXO set read errors and shutdown
  • 867c600 Catch LevelDB errors during flush
  • 06ca065 Fix CScriptID(const CScript& in) in empty script case
Credits

Thanks to everyone who contributed to this release:
  • 21E14
  • Adam Weiss
  • Aitor Pazos
  • Alexander Jeng
  • Alex Morcos
  • Alon Muroch
  • Andreas Schildbach
  • Andrew Poelstra
  • Andy Alness
  • Ashley Holman
  • Benedict Chan
  • Ben Holden-Crowther
  • Bryan Bishop
  • BtcDrak
  • Christian von Roques
  • Clinton Christian
  • Cory Fields
  • Cozz Lovan
  • daniel
  • Daniel Kraft
  • David Hill
  • Derek701
  • dexX7
  • dllud
  • Dominyk Tiller
  • Doug
  • elichai
  • elkingtowa
  • ENikS
  • Eric Shaw
  • Federico Bond
  • Francis GASCHET
  • Gavin Andresen
  • Giuseppe Mazzotta
  • Glenn Willen
  • Gregory Maxwell
  • gubatron
  • HarryWu
  • himynameismartin
  • Huang Le
  • Ian Carroll
  • imharrywu
  • Jameson Lopp
  • Janusz Lenar
  • JaSK
  • Jeff Garzik
  • JL2035
  • Johnathan Corgan
  • Jonas Schnelli
  • jtimon
  • Julian Haight
  • Kamil Domanski
  • kazcw
  • kevin
  • kiwigb
  • Kosta Zertsekel
  • LongShao007
  • Luke Dashjr
  • Mark Friedenbach
  • Mathy Vanvoorden
  • Matt Corallo
  • Matthew Bogosian
  • Micha
  • Michael Ford
  • Mike Hearn
  • mrbandrews
  • mruddy
  • ntrgn
  • Otto Allmendinger
  • paveljanik
  • Pavel Vasin
  • Peter Todd
  • phantomcircuit
  • Philip Kaufmann
  • Pieter Wuille
  • pryds
  • randy-waterhouse
  • R E Broadley
  • Rose Toomey
  • Ross Nicoll
  • Roy Badami
  • Ruben Dario Ponticelli
  • Rune K. Svendsen
  • Ryan X. Charles
  • Saivann
  • sandakersmann
  • SergioDemianLerner
  • shshshsh
  • sinetek
  • Stuart Cardall
  • Suhas Daftuar
  • Tawanda Kembo
  • Teran McKinney
  • tm314159
  • Tom Harding
  • Trevin Hofmann
  • Whit J
  • Wladimir J. van der Laan
  • Yoichi Hirai
  • Zak Wilcox
As well as everyone that helped translating on [Transifex](https://www.transifex.com/projects/p/bitcoin/).
Also lots of thanks to the bitcoin.org website team David A. Harding and Saivann Carignan.
Wladimir
original: http://lists.linuxfoundation.org/pipermail/bitcoin-dev/2015-February/007480.html
submitted by bitcoin-devlist-bot to bitcoin_devlist [link] [comments]

GUIDE: Coin launches and being prepared.

New CryptoCoin launch preperation guide;
I've created this short guide for new users who want to jump in on the mining of a newly launched coins. Being prepared and getting on the network immediately will lead to you finding the earliest blocks (some coins have block rewards that are higher in the beginning)
Step One - Prepare the Data/Wallet directory
The first step in this guide will be to setup the directory that will hold your wallet data, config file and blockchain store. We want to set this up first so we can immediately start solo mining without screwing around with settings that are common across all CryptoCoin wallets.
Windows 7/8; C:\Users\YOURUSERNAME\Appdata\Roaming\COIN_NAME
Windows XP; C:\Documents and Settings\YOURUSERNAME\Appdata\Roaming\COIN_NAME
Linux; ~/.coinname/
MacOS X - ~/Library/Application Support/
Create a directory in one of the above directories that will match the name of the coin (ie: Bitcoin). In this directory we are going to make the default .conf file;
Default options listed in the COINNAME.conf will be as follows;
server=1
listen=1
daemon=1
rpcuser=YOUR_DESIRED_USER_NAME
rpcpassword=YOUR_DESIRED_PASSWORD
rpcport=NUMERIC_PORT_TO_LISTEN_ON
rpcconnect=127.0.0.1
Change the rpcport parameter to a generic port # if you plan on only having one batch file to start solo mining. WARNING, this method will interfere with mining if multiple wallets are running using the same port number. If the launch forum post lists default rpcport #s, use them instead of one generic port. (cryptocointalk/bitcointalk).
Pay attention to the original launch information forum post, adding nodes with addnode=ipaddress, can help speed up node discovery and wallet sync. You can add these options fairly quickly with a cut and paste.
If you have multiple rigs and plan to throw their hashes at the wallet if it's not on the same machine, use the .conf option rpcallowip=your.network.address.* (eg: rpcallowip=192.168.0.*).
Step Two - Create your .bat file
If you've been mining for awhile, this should be a simple step, otherwise, it is beyond this tutorial on how to fine tune your mining software.
The .bat file should only be a few lines long;
setx GPU_MAX_ALLOC_PERCENT 100 setx GPU_USE_SYNC_OBJECTS 1
cgminer --scrypt -o http://127.0.0.1:WALLET_RPCPORT_PARAM -u YOUR_USERNAME -p YOUR_PASSWORD the_rest_of_your_miner_config_here
This is the default for scrypt mining. Always pay attention to the announcement post for specific mining options (CPU only, keccek, scrypt-n, etc).
Change the IP address in -o option to your wallet machines ip address, should be you mining from a different machine. (making sure to set the above rpcallowip= correctly)
note: adding gen=1 to your config file will automatically start the wallets internal block generation routine, by passing the need to start your mining software. Just remember to edit this option later if you run the wallet continually and do no plan to directly mine.
Step Three - Mine!
Download and install/extract wallet, run the wallet. If everything is set correctly, you should be ahead of the game and finding blocks very quickly.
If you've found this post informative, I'm never opposed to receiving gifts of Litecoin :D LXFE81zFSTkzsV1TrRCtdy781F1aiEfYHe
also: If you have any additions to this guide, please PM or comment, so that I may correct any errors I may have included.
edit: formatting.
submitted by agentneuron to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Mining trouble with another ccurrency

I know this isn't about bitcoin.I am trying my chances at solo mining emerald and is there anyone who knows how to set up cgminer to do that. I've tried doing it before, i've set up my username and password for the .conf and also put cgminer ex: cgminer.exe --scrypt -o localhost:12128 -u yourusername -p password. ~like i said I have the user and password~ but i put that in cgminer as a .bat and it opens but says in cgminer ~wrong url~ ~pool setup failed~.Also in the .conf im using the default in what a previous tutorial told me (rpcallowip=10.1.1.*) am I supposed to put my ip or what? Im so lost
submitted by mg4637 to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

Bitcoin Miner ++10BTC Daily Best Mining Generator Premium Payment Proof Legit Site!! Best Bitcoin Mining Site  Legit Site  Real Payment Proof! World Best bitcoin Mining Website 2020  How to mine BTC Without Investment - Bitcoin Giveaway How to mine bitcoins? What is Cryptomining? solo mining -pool Mining EXPLAINED! #AXT Free Bitcoin Mining website 2020  New Best Cloud Mining Site 2020  2750 GH/s Free SignUp Bonus

In this post I’ll review the top Bitcoin mining software available on the market. Bitcoin Mining Software Summary. Whether if you’re joining a mining pool or mining solo, you will need to get familiar with the most up-to-date mining software. The different software options out there vary by the miner types they support (GPU/ASIC/FPGA What is Solo Mining How it Works for the miners in the bitcoin. 1 Goto Start> All Programs> Speedcoin Wallet and open Speedcoin Config File. Bitcoin solo mining faq. How to Mine Bitcoin on a Mac Computer Skills Envato Tuts+ Jun 30 What are the probabilities of getting different Bitcoin mining rewards by using solo mining pool mining approaches. Le minage c’est le procédé par lequel les transactions Bitcoin sont sécurisées. A cette fin les mineurs effectuent avec leur matériel informatique des calculs mathématiques pour le réseau Bitcoin. Comme récompense pour leurs services, ils collectent les bitcoins nouvellement créés ainsi que les frais des transactions qu’ils confirment. Elle est divisée par deux tous les […] GUIMiner is the premier Bitcoin Mining tool for Windows and is one of the easiest ways to start mining Bitcoins. By offering a simple and easy to use graphical interface, GUIMiner will let you take full control of your Bitcoin mining process without requiring complicated commands or constantly editing configuration files. Finally, launch Bitcoin Miner software with localhost (127.0.0.1), the rpcport (Y=8332), the username (X), and password (Q) you set in bitcoin.conf. These are the values you chose as the credentials to connect to Bitcoin Core to start solo mining Bitcoin.

[index] [5693] [30685] [18534] [6178] [19498] [12857] [10833] [14924] [27001] [24433]

Bitcoin Miner ++10BTC Daily Best Mining Generator Premium Payment Proof Legit Site!!

Trusted online bitcoin cloud mining company. Safe & transparent bitcoin cloud miner pool 2020 Easy way to mine free bitcoins - now. Wap. Link tohttps://m.mul... Whether it is cloud mining, pool mining or solo mining, our software can deliver the work to the network of miners at the fastest speed..--- Bitcoin Miner ++10BTC Daily Best Mining Generator ... Twitter Founder Jack Dorsey interview: Bitcoin BTC Event & Twitter updates [April 30, 2020] Twitter 1,538 watching Live now Unlock the Bootloader of any Motorola Android device 2019! I'm going to talking about top free best bitcoin mining website, and I'm gonna tell you every steps to get bitcoin mining! In this video I'm showing how to make make money with Bitcoin Recommended ... How to solo CPU mine Bitcoin & Bitcoin derived cryptocurrencies (Works on OS X and Windows) ... How to mine bitcoins? What is Cryptomining? solo mining -pool Mining EXPLAINED! #AXT - Duration: 8:22.

Flag Counter